Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

More precise sensors to identify ocean acidification in the Baltic Sea

26.06.2014

The new European project PINBAL aims at the development of a spectrophotometric pH-measurement system for monitoring in the Baltic Sea

Today the European project PINBAL started with a kick-off meeting at the Leibniz Institute of Baltic Sea Research in Warnemünde (IOW).

The four participating partners of the project met to organize the next steps for project implementation. Beside the IOW, which is also responsible for the project coordination, the University of Gothenburg, the Institute of Oceanology in Sopot and the enterprise CONTROS Systems and Solution participate in PINBAL.

Since the beginning of the industrial era a considerable part of the increasing CO2 emissions dissolved into the ocean. As a result the pH value of the World´s Ocean has been decreased by 0.1. The International Panel of Climate Change (IPCC) considers the pH value to be decreased from 8.1 today to 7.7 in 2100 with severe consequences for the marine environment if the CO2 production follows a “business as usual” scheme.

For the Baltic Sea with its variable salinity, high concentrations of organic substances and the occurrence of hydrogen sulfide in the deep waters there are no suitable measuring methods up to day, to detect longtime variations. The PINBAL project group wants to bridge this gap.

Beside the monitoring demands, there is a strong interest of basic research, too, in such a development of a highly precise measuring method for the determination of the pH value in order to improve the option for investigating the Baltic Sea carbon dioxide turnovers.

Gregor Rehder, project coordinator and marine chemist at the IOW, describes the aims of the project. ”We want to develop a reliable and highly precise system to be deployed on so called voluntary observing ships (VOS).”

In recent years these VOS – cargo ships or ferries – have been equipped with automated measurement and sampling systems to create an efficient monitoring system for environmental parameters in surface waters of the Baltic Sea. They shall be the carrier of the future development as well.

PINBAL will receive funding for the next three years from BONUS (Art 185) funded jointly from the European Union’s Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration, and from Baltic Sea national funding institutions. 

Contact:

Prof. Dr. Gregor Rehder, Department of Marine Chemistry, Leibniz-Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde (IOW), (Phone: +49 381 / 5197 336, Email: gregor.rehder@io-warnemuende.de)

Dr. Barbara Hentzsch, Public Relation, IOW (Phone: +49 381 / 5197 102, Email: barbara.hentzsch@io-warnemuende.de)

Nils Ehrenberg, Public Relation, IOW (Phone: +49 381 / 5197 106, Email: nils.ehrenberg@io-warnemuende.de)

Dipl.-Phys. Peer Fietzek, CONTROS Systems & Solutions

Prof. Dr. Leif Anderson, University of Gothenburg

Dr. Karol Kulinski, Institute for Oceanology, Polish Academy of Science, Sopot

The IOW is a member of the Leibniz Association to which 89 research institutes and scientific infrastructure facilities for research currently belong. The focus of the Leibniz Institutes ranges from Natural, Engineering and Environmental Science to Economic, Social, and Space Sciences and to the humanities. The institutes are jointly financed at the state and national levels. The Leibniz Institutes employ a total of 17.200 people, of whom 8.200 are scientists, of which 3.300 are junior scientists. The total budget of the Institutes is more than 1.5 billion Euros. Third-party funds amount to approximately € 330 million per year.

Dr. Barbara Hentzsch | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.io-warnemuende.de

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Preservation of floodplains is flood protection
27.09.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Conservationists are sounding the alarm: parrots much more threatened than assumed
15.09.2017 | Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electrode materials from the microwave oven

19.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

New material for digital memories of the future

19.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Physics boosts artificial intelligence methods

19.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>