Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Lead continues to be a serious threat to California condor populations

09.04.2014

The California condor was one of the first species to be listed under the Endangered Species Preservation Act in 1966 when the population was reduced to a handful of birds. 

Through a massive collaborative effort that included fieldwork and breeding in zoos, the condor population has grown to more than 400 birds, more than half of which are now free-flying in the wild.

Unfortunately, there is overwhelming evidence that lead poisoning from accidental ingestion of spent ammunition is the leading cause of death in the wild population, and this may prevent the establishment of self-sustaining populations.

"After reviewing nearly 20 years of our mortality data on the free-ranging birds, it became clear that lead poisoning is the primary problem for the birds in the wild. And this is not just a problem for California condors.

We can view them as an indicator species, warning us about the hazards of widespread lead contamination in the environment." said Bruce Rideout, director of the wildlife disease laboratories for San Diego Zoo Global.

Our collaborators at the Wildlife Health Center at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California at Davis recently published a review of the impact of lead in ammunition on scavenging birds and what it means for the health of our shared environment. The review article can be found in the January edition of the journal EcoHealth.

Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes onsite wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents.

The important conservation and science work of these entities is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

Christina Simmons | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.sandiegozoo.org

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Major turtle nesting beaches protected in 1 of the UK's far flung overseas territories
30.07.2014 | University of Exeter

nachricht How Will Climate Change Impact Tropical Rainforests?
30.07.2014 | Michigan Technological University

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Counting down to FEBS-EMBO 2014 in Paris, France

29.07.2014 | Event News

9th European Wood-Based Panel Symposium 2014 – meeting point for the wood-based material branch

24.07.2014 | Event News

“Lens on Life” - Artists and Scientists Explore Cell Divison

08.07.2014 | Event News

 
Latest News

Research may explain how foremost anticancer 'guardian' protein learned to switch sides

30.07.2014 | Life Sciences

Siemens at InnoTrans 2014, the world's largest transport technology trade fair

30.07.2014 | Trade Fair News

Major turtle nesting beaches protected in 1 of the UK's far flung overseas territories

30.07.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>