Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Joint strategies for climate-afflicted Alpine Region

07.07.2011
Natural hazards at a time of climate change – results of the AdaptAlp transnational project are presented and discussed at an international Closing Conference

Over the course of the last hundred years, the temperature in the Alps has risen by 1.5°C. This is twice the global average. The inhabitants of this highly sensitive ecosystem are already experiencing the consequences of this rise in temperature.

They have to cope with increasingly frequent incidents caused by natural hazards such as floods, debris flow or avalanches. What actions can be taken jointly by Alpine countries to deal with the consequences of climate change? To what extent can the Alps be made into a safer place for humans to live? These were the fundamental questions underlying the AdaptAlp project, and its findings were presented in Munich during the international Closing Conference on July 6th 2011.

Further to the 16 project partners from ministries, local authorities, research institutes and NGOs in the Alpine countries, numerous other interested parties from administrative, scientific and practical fields were present to share in this concluding event. The agenda featured technical presentations and panel discussions with representatives of the EU commission as well as national and regional co-ordinators and decision-makers.

During the course of the three year project, data were collected systematically over the entire Alpine region, which were subsequently evaluated and analysed, charting, for example the development of discharge intensities and landslides .The information collected is being exploited to improve models for climate prognosis and impact analysis within the Alpine region. So, for example, there were reports which, applying the very latest climate scenarios, described the changes in the hydrological conditions in the river catchment areas of the Inn, the Alpine Rhine, the Soèa, the Upper Rhone and the Adda. The transnational partnership also served to break down language barriers as well as develop unified methods of hazard mapping. The collaboration between the administrative offices of all the Alpine countries (and additionally those of Spain and England) resulted in the compilation of a glossary which makes more accessible the geological concepts dealing with natural hazard management, thus simplifying communication amongst participating partners.

An additional bonus, reaching beyond the scientific work, was the enhanced awareness of natural hazards in times of climate change which was achieved by reaching a wider audience. Information leaflets and initiatives were not just aimed at experts, representatives of the communities and politicians, but also addressed children and other young people. The information portal ‘Biber Berti’ (‘Berti the Beaver’) provides an easy way for teachers and children to find out more about natural hazards and climate change.

Additionally, in the so-called “Common Strategic Paper” (CSP), there is a summary of all the project results which are designed to support political decisions. The CSP lists the most important recommendations of the project partners. Apart from project activities, and background information ensuring a better understanding of climate change scenarios and risk management, this final publication also contains ten examples of adaptation strategies implemented in the Alpine region. The CSP recommendations are all based on well-founded scientific data compiled and collated by the project partners from all Alpine regions. The document was prepared during workshops run under the scientific aegis of the European Academy of Bolzano, in close collaboration with the leading project partner, the Bavarian State Ministry of the Environment and Public Health.

Laura Defranceschi | idw
Further information:
http://www.adaptalp.org/

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Safeguarding sustainability through forest certification mapping
27.06.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Dune ecosystem modelling
26.06.2017 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

Leipzig HTP-Forum discusses "hydrothermal processes" as a key technology for a biobased economy

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers create new technique for manipulating polarization of terahertz radiation

20.07.2017 | Information Technology

High-tech sensing illuminates concrete stress testing

20.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

First direct observation and measurement of ultra-fast moving vortices in superconductors

20.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>