Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

An essay proves that vegetation could recover in the ski resort of Sierra Nevada

15.12.2008
The conditioning Works of Sierra Nevada’s ski runs have destroyed a great amount of vegetable species. The researchers of the University of Granada (Spain) have already managed to grow in the laboratory two native bushy species in order to suggest new mechanisms for vegetable cover restoration. They will try to use them to preserve the biodiversity in the National Park of Sierra Nevada.

The vegetable species of Sierra Nevada are the 30% of Spain’s floral richness and they are impoverishing due to the maintenance with heavy plant of the ski runs. Soil erosion is increasing and the loss of biodiversity gets worse, as 80 of the more than 2,000 vascular plants present are endemic of this massif.

This new experiment, whose results will be published in the next issue of the Central European Journal of Biology, will permit “to recover the spoiled areas, improve the present restoration methodology of the vegetable cover and landscape integration, and favour the preservation of biodiversity in such a fragile area such as Sierra Nevada”, explains to SINC Francisco Serrano Bernardo, main author of the study and Researcher in the field of Environmental Technologies.

The scientists studied two native bushy species of Sierra Nevada, among other taxons: Genista versicolor Boiss (Leguminous) and Reseda complicata Bory (Resedacea), whose ecological niche is, above all, in the ski resort and its environment.

In order to manage the recovery in its natural environment, the researchers wanted to know “some environmental requirements such plants need to optimize their germination and growth processes”. The main problem of bushes is that, in the short term, “they do not manage to regulate themselves to recover their biodiversity naturally”.

Seeds growing in the laboratory
The study has been carried out from three different samples of several soils of the ski resort. The goal is to test if these species seeds are able to grow in different experimental conditions. Soils have not been contingent; they were selected according to the orientation, the slope, the height and the location of the runs in the resort, among other aspects.

Treatments with different vegetable growth regulators (auxins, gibberellins, cytokinins and ethylene) were applied to the seeds “to improve germinative and growth percentages in laboratory and make easier the later transfer and application of the results to the ski resort”, the researcher says.

Seeds germinated and grew successfully in the laboratory. According to Serrano, the effectiveness of the regulators has been tested in aspects such as the formation of the radical system, stem elongation, cotyledon expansion (simple leaves which feed the plant) or leaves appearance.

Once the treatments are applied to the field, they are expected to “favour the recovery of the vegetable cover in a space of time considerably lower to that needed without any intervention”, the experts say.

Carlos Centeno Cuadros | alfa
Further information:
http://prensa.ugr.es/prensa/research/verNota/prensa.php?nota=570

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Dry landscapes can increase disease transmission
20.06.2018 | Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.

nachricht 100 % Organic Farming in Bhutan – a Realistic Target?
15.06.2018 | Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Temperature-controlled fiber-optic light source with liquid core

In a recent publication in the renowned journal Optica, scientists of Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena showed that they can accurately control the optical properties of liquid-core fiber lasers and therefore their spectral band width by temperature and pressure tuning.

Already last year, the researchers provided experimental proof of a new dynamic of hybrid solitons– temporally and spectrally stationary light waves resulting...

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Could this material enable autonomous vehicles to come to market sooner?

20.06.2018 | Materials Sciences

Innovative autonomous system for identifying schools of fish

20.06.2018 | Information Technology

Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gestures

20.06.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>