Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Boat Owners Can Fight with New Eco-Friendly Method

04.07.2013
A new eco-friendly method to fight the accumulation of barnacles on the hulls of boats and ships has been developed by Emiliano Pinori in cooperation with colleagues at the University of Gothenburg and the SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden in Borås.

Barnacles can be found in all marine environments and are a major problem for both small boats and large ships. Barnacles accumulate on the hulls and can reduce the fuel economy of a vessel by up to 40 per cent, increasing CO2 emissions accordingly.


Photography: All photos by Mats Hulander, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg
Photography: All photos by Mats Hulander, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg

Barnacles penetrate the surface
While most marine organisms that attach themselves to hulls – for example mussels and algae – can easily be scraped off, barnacles literally grow into the surface and form dense calcium deposits underneath the paint.

The most common method used to prevent fouling is to mix the paint with a poisonous substance. The poison is then released slowly from the painted hull to discourage invaders, and eventually ends up in the water to the detriment of other marine organisms. This is how for example tributyltin oxide (TBTO), a biocide used in the 1980s and 1990s, led to a global environmental disaster. TBTO was banned worldwide after it was discovered that the use was making oysters and similar animals infertile.

About 90 per cent of the anti-fouling hull paints used today are based on copper oxide, causing large amounts of copper to be released into the seas and oceans.

‘This type of environmental effect cannot be accepted in the long run,’ says Pinori.

Digging their own grave in the paint
Now Pinori has found a new method. With the new method, the paint and the poison are modified so that the poison is kept inside the paint, minimising the release of it into the water. Instead, the barnacle’s own ability to penetrate the paint is used. When the organisms attach to the surface, the poisoning begins.

‘You can say that they dig their own grave in the paint,’ says Pinori.

Zero emissions possible
The toxin used in the new type of paint is ivermectin – a molecule produced by the bacterium Streptomyces avermitilis. A good effect has been achieved with only one gram of ivermectin per litre of paint, or a concentration of only .1 per cent. The effect lasts for many years and can replace the copper currently used in hull paints. The research indicates that only very small amounts of the substance leach into the water.

‘My research shows that the small amounts that are released are unrelated to the effectiveness of the method. This means that if we can eliminate the leaching completely, the effect will not be sacrificed. Zero emissions will be our next goal. We’re looking forward to continuing the development of this method within the EU project LEAF, Low Emission Anti-Fouling. It’s a three-year project that SP has been granted together with Professor Elwing’s group at the University of Gothenburg and other international partners,’ says Pinori.

Title of the doctoral thesis: Low Biocide Emission Antifouling Based on a Novel Route of Barnacle Intoxication
Link to the thesis: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/32814
Link to the project: http://www.leaf-antifouling.eu
Supervisor: Dr. Mattias Berglin, SP Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces, Borås, and the Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, and Professor Hans Elwing at the University of Gothenburg.
Contact: Emiliano Pinori, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg and SP, tel.: +46 (0)705 27 56 13, emiliano.pinori@sp.se

Photography: All photos by Mats Hulander, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg

Annika Koldenius | idw
Further information:
http://www.gu.se

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Litter is present throughout the world’s oceans: 1,220 species affected
27.03.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

nachricht International network connects experimental research in European waters
21.03.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Gewässerökologie und Binnenfischerei (IGB)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers shoot for success with simulations of laser pulse-material interactions

29.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindling

29.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundation

29.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>