Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Boat Owners Can Fight with New Eco-Friendly Method

04.07.2013
A new eco-friendly method to fight the accumulation of barnacles on the hulls of boats and ships has been developed by Emiliano Pinori in cooperation with colleagues at the University of Gothenburg and the SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden in Borås.

Barnacles can be found in all marine environments and are a major problem for both small boats and large ships. Barnacles accumulate on the hulls and can reduce the fuel economy of a vessel by up to 40 per cent, increasing CO2 emissions accordingly.


Photography: All photos by Mats Hulander, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg
Photography: All photos by Mats Hulander, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg

Barnacles penetrate the surface
While most marine organisms that attach themselves to hulls – for example mussels and algae – can easily be scraped off, barnacles literally grow into the surface and form dense calcium deposits underneath the paint.

The most common method used to prevent fouling is to mix the paint with a poisonous substance. The poison is then released slowly from the painted hull to discourage invaders, and eventually ends up in the water to the detriment of other marine organisms. This is how for example tributyltin oxide (TBTO), a biocide used in the 1980s and 1990s, led to a global environmental disaster. TBTO was banned worldwide after it was discovered that the use was making oysters and similar animals infertile.

About 90 per cent of the anti-fouling hull paints used today are based on copper oxide, causing large amounts of copper to be released into the seas and oceans.

‘This type of environmental effect cannot be accepted in the long run,’ says Pinori.

Digging their own grave in the paint
Now Pinori has found a new method. With the new method, the paint and the poison are modified so that the poison is kept inside the paint, minimising the release of it into the water. Instead, the barnacle’s own ability to penetrate the paint is used. When the organisms attach to the surface, the poisoning begins.

‘You can say that they dig their own grave in the paint,’ says Pinori.

Zero emissions possible
The toxin used in the new type of paint is ivermectin – a molecule produced by the bacterium Streptomyces avermitilis. A good effect has been achieved with only one gram of ivermectin per litre of paint, or a concentration of only .1 per cent. The effect lasts for many years and can replace the copper currently used in hull paints. The research indicates that only very small amounts of the substance leach into the water.

‘My research shows that the small amounts that are released are unrelated to the effectiveness of the method. This means that if we can eliminate the leaching completely, the effect will not be sacrificed. Zero emissions will be our next goal. We’re looking forward to continuing the development of this method within the EU project LEAF, Low Emission Anti-Fouling. It’s a three-year project that SP has been granted together with Professor Elwing’s group at the University of Gothenburg and other international partners,’ says Pinori.

Title of the doctoral thesis: Low Biocide Emission Antifouling Based on a Novel Route of Barnacle Intoxication
Link to the thesis: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/32814
Link to the project: http://www.leaf-antifouling.eu
Supervisor: Dr. Mattias Berglin, SP Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces, Borås, and the Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, and Professor Hans Elwing at the University of Gothenburg.
Contact: Emiliano Pinori, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg and SP, tel.: +46 (0)705 27 56 13, emiliano.pinori@sp.se

Photography: All photos by Mats Hulander, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg

Annika Koldenius | idw
Further information:
http://www.gu.se

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Dispersal of Fish Eggs by Water Birds – Just a Myth?
19.02.2018 | Universität Basel

nachricht Removing fossil fuel subsidies will not reduce CO2 emissions as much as hoped
08.02.2018 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Designer cells: artificial enzyme can activate a gene switch

22.05.2018 | Life Sciences

PR of MCC: Carbon removal from atmosphere unavoidable for 1.5 degree target

22.05.2018 | Earth Sciences

Achema 2018: New camera system monitors distillation and helps save energy

22.05.2018 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>