Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Big changes in the Sargasso Sea

24.09.2014

Over one thousand miles wide and three thousand miles long, the Sargasso Sea occupies almost two thirds of the North Atlantic Ocean. Within the sea, circling ocean currents accumulate mats of Sargassum seaweed that shelter a surprising variety of fishes, snails, crabs, and other small animals.

A recent paper by MBARI researcher Crissy Huffard and others shows that in 2011 and 2012 this animal community was much less diverse than it was in the early 1970s, when the last detailed studies were completed in this region. 


Small rafts of Sargassum seaweed like this one are a common site in the Sargasso Sea. These rafts harbor a variety of small animals. Image: Debbie Nail Meyer © 2011 MBARI

This study was based on field research led by MBARI Senior Scientist Ken Smith, using the Lone Ranger, a 78-meter (255-foot) research vessel owned and operated by the Schmidt Ocean Institute. During three cruises in 2011 and 2012, Smith’s team steamed across the Sargasso Sea and used dip nets to collect samples of Sargassum seaweed (and its associated animals) at six different locations. They then classified and counted all the animals at each site.

The researchers chose their sampling and counting methods carefully so that they could compare their results with previous surveys that had been conducted in 1972 and 1973 in the same general part of the Sargasso Sea. Amazingly, the researchers could find no other studies between 1973 and 2011 during which scientists had systematically counted the Sargassum animal communities in this area. 

When the team analyzed the data from the recent cruises, they were surprised to find that animal communities in the Sargassum rafts were significantly less diverse than those observed in the 1970s. For example, 13 species of animals in several different groups (worms, nudibranchs, crustaceans, and sea spiders) were observed in the historical samples but were missing from the recent samples.

Unfortunately, the researchers did not have enough data to determine whether the differences they observed were the result of long-term shifts in ocean conditions in the Sargasso Sea or natural variations from place-to-place, month-to-month, or year-to-year. 

The authors note that ocean conditions were much cooler than normal during February 2011 and that there were large differences in animal communities observed just six months apart, in August 2011 and February 2012. So it is possible that this area routinely sees large natural variations in the types of animals present. As Huffard put it, “If this is a long-term decline [in biodiversity], then it is a very significant one. But we don’t know if this is part of the natural variability in this community.”

Previous studies indicate that much of the seaweed that ends up in the Sargasso Sea originates in the Gulf of Mexico and is carried into the central Atlantic by the Gulf Stream and other currents. This suggests that, in addition to local ocean conditions, large-scale variations in ocean currents and conditions in the Gulf of Mexico could affect the animals in Sargassum communities.

To tease out these confounding variables, Smith and Huffard are hoping to conduct a series of follow-up expeditions to the Sargasso Sea. They plan to focus on the northern part of the Sargasso Sea, near Bermuda, where more detailed historical data are available. They are presently working on a proposal for a grant that would allow them to analyze satellite imagery and collect field samples twice a year for three years. The proposed study would show how much year-to-year variability is normal for this region. 

At first glance, the animals that live in Sargassum rafts seem isolated from the rest of the world. But, like the seaweed they live in, these animal communities have many links to larger ocean food webs. For example, Sargassum animals provide essential food for sea birds, sea turtles, and bluefin tuna—all long-distance migrators. In fact, Sargassum rafts have been designated as “essential fish habitat” by the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council. 

The world’s oceans are changing, with water temperatures and ocean acidity on the rise and oxygen concentrations on the decline. In the Sargasso Sea, as in many other locations, detecting the biological effects of these long-term trends is a formidable challenge because animal communities can vary dramatically over short time periods. This study shows that animal communities in the Sargasso Sea are definitely changing. The next step is to find out why.

###

For additional information or images relating to this news release, please contact:

Kim Fulton-Bennett
831-775-1835, kfb@mbari.org

Original journal article:
C.L. Huffard, S. von Thun, A.D. Sherman, K. Sealey and K.L. Smith, Jr. (2014) Pelagic Sargassum community change over a 40-year period: temporal and spatial variability. Marine Biology, doi10.1007/s00227-014-2539-y.

Kim Fulton-Bennett | Eurek Alert!

Further reports about: Aquarium Atlantic Bay Aquarium Research MBARI Monterey Sargasso Sea animals long-term seaweed variations

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht How does the loss of species alter ecosystems?
18.05.2017 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Excess diesel emissions bring global health & environmental impacts
16.05.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>