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A Science Policy Webinar: Wetlands Function and Response to Extreme Events

06.10.2010
Our nation’s wetlands serve as a filter for much of our water system, provide wildlife habitat, and flood regulation. When disasters strike, the impacts to these wetlands can be significant, jeopardizing the ecosystem services that they provide. As a result, foresight about how to manage these areas in the face of disaster is critical.

Join leading researchers as they provide information about our nation's valuable resources, and identify research that can help guide the conservation and recovery of these vital systems. As the general public and policy makers expand their discussions and interest in these resources, this webinar is timed to provide necessary information.

On Tuesday, Oct. 5, from 3:30 to 4:30 pm (EDT), a Wetlands Webinar discussing the value of wetlands in serving as a buffering system to the impacts of extreme events such as hurricanes, floods, fire, and oil spills will be presented.

The panel of experts on the wetlands webinar will include:
• Dr. John Day of the Coastal Ecology Institute at Louisiana State University
• Dr. K. Ramesh Reddy of the Soil and Water Science Department at University of Florida

• Dr. Daniel R. Petrolia of the Department of Agricultural Economics at Mississippi State University

The complimentary webinar is sponsored by the Council on Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics (C-FARE) and Soil Science Society of America (SSSA).

"Many of today's important scientific and societal questions are best addressed from a multi-disciplinary perspective," stated Jon Brandt, C-FARE Chair. "Our organizations are enthusiastic about working together to present cutting edge information to policy makers, researchers and user groups."

"The nation’s wetlands are an eco-resource on which we all depend for safe water supplies, wildlife habitat, flood regulation, and many other benefits. The researchers participating in this web-based seminar are leaders in this field," says Paul Bertsch, Past President of the Soil Science Society of America. "They will provide useful information as we seek ways to maintain the wetlands on which we all depend."

Registration is free but space is limited. Please visit the following website to register for the webinar: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/924334986. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

The Council on Food, Agricultural, and Resource Economics (C-FARE) is a non-profit organization dedicated to strengthening the national presence of the agricultural economics profession. C-FARE's governing board includes prominent agricultural economists representing a wide range of public and private sector interests.

The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) is a progressive, international scientific society that fosters the transfer of knowledge and practices to sustain global soils. Based in Madison, WI, and founded in 1936, SSSA is the professional home for 6,000+ members dedicated to advancing the field of soil science, providing information about soils in relation to crop production, environmental quality, ecosystem sustainability, bioremediation, waste management, recycling, and wise land use. For more information, visit www.soils.org.

Sara Uttech | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.soils.org

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