Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Torque limiting clutches for high-speed applications in test stands

17.07.2013
Test stand applications set maximum requirements on torque limiting clutches, which quickly overstrain the standard designs available on the market.

In addition, the installation spaces available are becoming increasingly small due to the increasingly compact constructions. Mayr power transmission has therefore developed the new torque limiting clutch EAS-HSC (High-Speed-Compact) for speeds of up to 12,000 rpm.


EAS-HSC clutches transmit the torque backlash-free during operation, and allow the drive components to slow down freely on overload.

In test stand technology, torque limiting clutches must be capable of transmitting the torque backlash-free and with torsional rigidity at extremely high speeds. The only devices suitable for this purpose are residual torque-free or disengaging torque limiting clutches, which allow the stored rotational energy in coupled masses to slow down freely.

Torque limiting clutches in high-speed applications must have a high balance quality in every individual component, so that optimum running smoothness of the drive train is guaranteed in combination with the components. Therefore, the optimisation of the mass unbalance was one of the highest priorities in the technical specifications.

In addition to their extremely compact construction, a high performance density reduces the rotating masses, which has a positive effect on running smoothness and machine dynamics. The clutch is balanced in completely assembled condition to a balance quality of G 2.5 at a reference speed of 3000 rpm.

If the torque in the drive line exceeds the limit value set on the EAS-HSC, the clutch disengages via a unique disengagement mechanism. This holds it securely in disengaged position. The torque drops immediately and an installed limit switch detects the disengagement movement and switches off the drive.

The limit switch signal can also be used for further control functions. The clutch separates the input and output completely and remains in this condition until it is re-engaged by hand or using a device.

In normal operation, the torque on the EAS-HSC is transmitted using balls which engage simultaneously with the hub and drive flange grooves. Cup springs clamp the balls via a ring. The level of the spring force is proportional to the transmittable torque. This principle also remains backlash-free when the grooves wear down, as the cup springs have a falling characteristic curve. Therefore, the torque is transmitted with torsional rigidity up to the pre-set trigger value. In case of overload, the pre-tension force of the spring and the clutch trigger highly accurately.

The clutches transmit the torque backlash-free during operation, and ensure that the drive components slow down freely on overload. During the overtravel time, no engagement impacts occur which might have a negative effect on the drive line. Re-engagement takes place “synchronously” only at the disengagement position. This is frequently required if the input and output always have to have the same angular position to each other.

With its five construction sizes, the EAS-HSC provides nominal torques from 5 to 1000 Nm. Depending on the size, speeds from 6000 to 12,000 rpm are permitted.

Contact:
Chr. Mayr GmbH + Co. KG, Eichenstraße 1, 87665 Mauerstetten, Dipl.-Ing. (FH) Hermann Bestle
Tel.: 08341/804-232, Fax: 08341/804-49232
E-Mail: hermann.bestle@mayr.de, Web: http://www.mayr.com

Hermann Bestle | Chr. Mayr GmbH + Co KG
Further information:
http://www.mayr.com

More articles from Machine Engineering:

nachricht Scientists from Hannover develop a novel lightweight production process
27.09.2017 | IPH - Institut für Integrierte Produktion Hannover gGmbH

nachricht PRESTO – Highly Dynamic Powerhouses
15.05.2017 | JULABO GmbH

All articles from Machine Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

15.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

15.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists

15.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>