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Siemens to expand range of time relays

05.12.2014

• New Sirius 3RP25 mono-functional and multi-functional time relays offer up to 27 functions
• Series offers greater space-saving and global use
• Semiconductor output for high switching frequencies and wear-free switching
• Wide voltage range expanded to 12V - 240V AC/DC

Siemens is expanding its portfolio of monitoring and control devices to include a series of new time relays which offer greater space-saving and enhanced functionality.

The Sirius 3RP25 series incorporates everything from mono-functional devices with common functions, such as switch-on and return delay, through to multi-functional devices for every application with the ability to integrate up to 27 functions in a single device.

The 3RP25 time relays have a new enclosure design and its mono-functional devices with a width of 17.5mm offer the greatest space-saving in the control cabinet. The wide voltage range for direct current and alternating current (AC/DC) have also been expanded uniformly to 12V - 240V, enabling the number of device variants to be almost halved, minimising logistics and simplifying configuring and service.

The new series boasts the necessary international certification meaning the time relays can be used globally. The new devices are also equipped with a watchdog function which is particularly effective for controlling clock times in cyclic sequences, providing benefits in many industrial applications, such as conveyor belts.

The variants with wear-free semiconductor output can be used effectively in applications with frequent, short switching operations, such as longitudinal feed in punching or embossing machines.

The product range encompasses removable terminals in widths of 17.5mm or 22.5mm and in the mid-term, will replace time relays of the 3RP15 range.

Simon Keogh, Siemens UK & Ireland, comments: “Thanks to their new functions, the 3RP25 devices are even more flexible in use than the previous versions, particularly in applications involving compressors or elevators for example, or in woodworking.”

For further information on Sirius time relays, visit www.siemens.de/relays

Siemens media contacts

Paul Addison
Phone: +44 7808 823 011 E-mail: paul.addison@siemens.com

Gemma Perks
Phone: +44 121 713 3829 E-mail: gemma.perks@mccann.com

For further information, please see: www.siemens.co.uk/press 
Follow us on Twitter at: www.twitter.com/siemensuknews


About Siemens
Siemens is a global technology powerhouse that stands for engineering excellence, innovation, quality, reliability and internationality. The company is active in more than 200 countries, focusing on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalisation. One of the world’s largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is No. 1 in offshore wind turbine construction, a leading supplier of combined cycle turbines for power generation, a leading provider of power transmission solutions and a pioneer in infrastructure solutions and automation and software solutions for industry. The company is also a leading supplier of medical imaging equipment – such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems – and a leader in laboratory diagnostics as well as clinical IT. In fiscal 2013, which ended on September 30, 2013, revenue from continuing operations totalled €75.9 billion and income from continuing operations €4.2 billion. Siemens has around 362,000 employees worldwide on the basis of continuing operations. Further information is available on the Internet at www.siemens.co.uk

Gemma Webb, mccann.com | Siemens AG

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