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More performance and expanded functions for mid-range and high-range controllers

15.04.2010
The Siemens Industry Automation Division has expanded its portfolio of mid-range and high-range S7-300 and S7-400 Simatic controllers and improved their performance.

A new firmware, with Profinet functions such as isochronous mode, I Device, Shared Device and Media Redundancy Protocol, and an integrated web server expand the functionality and application fields of the controllers significantly. In addition, the S7-400 controller family has been supplemented by the new CPU 412-2 PN/DP for the lower performance segment. On the Simatic S7-300 the working memory and performance of the CPU 319-3 PN/DP have been increased.

The upgraded CPU 319-3 PN/DP of the Simatic S7-300 controllers now has considerably more working memory and performance than its predecessor version. Equipped with two Profinet ports and a working memory of 2 megabytes (2.5 megabytes in the fail-safe version), the CPU now achieves a bit processing time of four nanoseconds, i.e. a computing speed that is two and a half times faster. The new CPU 412-2 PN/DP for the Simatic S7-400 controllers is provided with a variety of communication functions and is designed for the lower performance segment. Furthermore, the working memory capacity of the CPUs 414 and 416 has been increased.

The new firmware V 3.2 for the S7-300 controllers and V 6.0 for S7-400 controllers provide enhanced options in system design and simplified maintenance and diagnostics functions. The firmware incorporates the Profinet functions isochronous mode, I Device, Shared Device and Media Redundancy Protocol, as well as a web server with user-definable web pages. The new firmware is available for the Profinet controllers CPU 319-3 PN/DP, 315/317-2 PN/DP and their fail-safe variants CPU 315F-2 PN/DP and CPU 317F-2 PN/DP, as well as for the new S7-400 controllers CPU 412-2 PN/DP and the CPUs 414/416-3 PN/DP.

The Siemens Industry Sector (Erlangen, Germany) is the worldwide leading supplier of environmentally friendly production, transportation, building and lighting technologies. With integrated automation technologies and comprehensive industry-specific solutions, Siemens increases the productivity, efficiency and flexibility of its customers in the fields of industry and infrastructure. The Sector consists of six divisions: Building Technologies, Drive Technologies, Industry Automation, Industry Solutions, Mobility and Osram. With around 207,000 employees worldwide (September 30), Siemens Industry achieved in fiscal year 2009 total sales of approximately €35 billion.

The Siemens Industry Automation Division (Nuremberg, Germany) is a worldwide leader in the fields of automation systems, industrial controls and industrial software. Its portfolio ranges from standard products for the manufacturing and process industries to solutions for whole industrial sectors that encompass the automation of entire automobile production facilities and chemical plants. As a leading software supplier, Industry Automation optimizes the entire value added chain of manufacturers – from product design and development to production, sales and a wide range of maintenance services. With around 39,000 employees worldwide (September 30), Siemens Industry Automation achieved sales of €7.0 billion in fiscal year 2009.

Reference Number: IIA2010042237e

Gerhard Stauss | Siemens Industry
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/simatic-s7-400
http://www.siemens.com/industry
http://www.siemens.com/industryautomation

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