Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Machines that Can Feel / Sensitive Machine Components with Laser Technology

27.03.2013
The LZH has used a laser structuring process to develop an innovative sensor for complex, three-dimensional tooling components.

An isolating layer and a sensor layer are coated directly onto the tooling component, and the sensor is then structured using an ultrashort pulsed laser. Since masks are not necessary, these robust, high-quality thin-film sensors can be economically produced in small and medium-sized lots.


Laser-structured strain gauges in a groove in a machine component


Laser-structured strain gauges in a groove in a machine component (close-up)

Scientists use a trick to make the slightest strain on parts of a tooling machine visible. They can measure stress on the fly, or recognize a dull cutting tool at an early stage. The Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will show how this stress gauge works at this year’s Hannover Messe, from April 8th to 12th.

How can information on the condition of a tooling machine or process forces and vibrations be monitored during the manufacturing process, and even more important, how can this information be used for process optimization? This information can be measured using sensor modules with gentelligent (genetic + intelligent) components, which help a machine “feel”. This is the goal of a special research area “653” under the leadership of the Institute for Production Engineering and Machine Tools, University of Hannover, together with the LZH.

However, it is not simple to build such sensors. Tooling machines are usually very rigid, so that processing stresses cause only minimal deformation or distortion. In order to be able to measure these deformations precisely, the engineers used a “trick”. They placed strain gauges in the bottom of grooves in the machine components, where stresses are highest, and where stress gauges can make the most precise measurements.

However, up to now, it was not possible to place strain gauges in the bottom of grooves, as they are very difficult to access, and structures are usually complicated. Photolithographic sensors can only be used for flat surfaces, and strain gauges on foils, which are fixed to the machine using adhesives, are not suitable for the rough conditions in manufacturing processes.

The group “Laser-Micromachining” at the LZH used a laser structuring process to develop an innovative sensor for complex, three-dimensional tooling components. An isolating layer and a sensor layer are coated directly onto the tooling component, and the sensor is then structured using an ultrashort pulsed laser, with lateral resolutions from 10 to 100 µm. A laser scanner is used to ensure a fast structuring process. Since masks are not necessary, these high-quality thin-film sensors can be economically produced in small and medium-sized lots.

First prototypes of these laser structured sensors have already been integrated in the Z-axis slides of a tooling machine. Strain tests have shown that the sensors can measure even the smallest stresses, down to 0.001%.
Visitors to the LZH Stand at the Hannover Messe (Hall 17, Stand E 67) can test the function of these laser structured strain gauges themselves.
The work took place within the framework of the SFB project “Gentelligent Components in Life Cycle”, and have been financed by the German Research Foundation (DFG) since July, 2005.

Contact:
Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.
Michael Botts
Hollerithallee 8
D-30419 Hannover, Germany
Tel.: +49 511 2788-151
Fax: +49 511 2788-100
E-Mail: m.botts@lzh.de

The Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) carries out research and development in the field of laser technology and is supported by the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Labour and Transport of the State of Lower Saxony (Niedersächsisches Ministerium für Wirtschaft, Arbeit und Verkehr).

Michael Botts | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.
Further information:
http://www.lzh.de

More articles from Machine Engineering:

nachricht Evaluating risk of hydrogen embrittlement: new simulation of cold cracks in high-strength steels
03.05.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoffmechanik IWM

nachricht Nanostructured Alloying with Oxygen
09.04.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH

All articles from Machine Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Designer cells: artificial enzyme can activate a gene switch

22.05.2018 | Life Sciences

PR of MCC: Carbon removal from atmosphere unavoidable for 1.5 degree target

22.05.2018 | Earth Sciences

Achema 2018: New camera system monitors distillation and helps save energy

22.05.2018 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>