Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UT Dallas lab eliminates rare metals in electric motors

20.05.2014

Lab Shows Powerful, Possible Next Step in Electric Motors at Summit

A team from the Renewable Energy and Vehicular Technology Laboratory (REVT) at UT Dallas was one of a few research groups selected for advanced participation in a Department of Energy conference aimed at presenting the next generation of energy technologies.


Research conducted by Dr. Wei Wang (left) and Dr. Babak Fahimi, director of the Renewable Energy and Vehicular Technology Laboratory (REVT), was demonstrated at the recent Department of Energy conference.


Dr. Chenjie Lin, a postdoctoral researcher, was among those who demonstrated the double-stator switched reluctance machine at the ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit.

The DOE’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) program hosts an annual summit in Washington, D.C., for researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives and government officials to share transformational research funded through the program.

Dr. Babak Fahimi, professor of electrical engineering in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science and director of REVT, has received $2.8 million through an ARPA-E program aimed at reducing rare earth metals, which are used in motors of electric vehicles. The metals are expensive, difficult to find and are usually imported into the United States from countries such as China. In addition, the mining process for these metals releases significant amounts of pollution into the atmosphere.

While hundreds of award recipients were invited to exhibit their research, Fahimi’s team was one of five selected to demonstrate their work to lawmakers and participate in a round-table discussion on climate change.

REVT members demonstrated electric motors or generators that eliminate rare earth metals. Typical motors are powered through the electromagnetic interaction between a rotor, which contains rare earth metals and rotates, and another part known as a stator, which is stationary but houses electromagnetic sources. The REVT solution, called a double-stator switched reluctance machine (DSSRM), has two stators, one on either side of the rotor, that cause an electromagnetic reaction that produces power. This approach produces significantly greater power and torque at a given size and weight than traditional motor technologies without the use of permanent magnets.

“The transformative nature of our motor technology stems from a novel magnetic configuration, which significantly reduces the radial forces while increasing the motional forces by a factor of three,” Fahimi said. “This technology also benefits from high levels of fault tolerance, low-cost manufacturing and low acoustic noise. I strongly believe this technology is highly appealing to automotive, oil and gas, and renewable energy industries.”

Besides delivering more power and torque than competing technologies, this machine could be manufactured entirely in the United States, which would eliminate the pollution from mining rare earth metals, while also significantly reducing the amount of air pollution released through electric vehicle emissions. Other applications of this technology are airplanes, fans, pumps, wind generators and robots.

The research, first funded in 2012, has one patent pending. At the conference earlier this year, REVT members demonstrated the technology to potential commercial licensees.

Team members who demonstrated the technology included Pete Poorman, assistant director of corporate relations, and Drs. Wei Wang and Chenjie Lin, postdoctoral researchers in the lab.

“Having the opportunity to present at the ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was a huge opportunity to further our work,” Poorman said. “Being one of the few projects selected for the round-table discussion and congressional reception is both an honor and an acknowledgement of the excellent work being done in the REVT lab.”

Media Contact: LaKisha Ladson, UT Dallas, (972) 883-4183, lakisha.ladson@utdallas.edu
or the Office of Media Relations, UT Dallas, (972) 883-2155, newscenter@utdallas.edu.

LaKisha Ladson | Eurek Alert!
Further information:
http://www.utdallas.edu/news/2014/5/16-30081_Lab-Shows-Powerful-Possible-Next-Step-in-Electric-_story-wide.html

Further reports about: ARPA-E Energy acoustic emissions entrepreneurs motors pumps switched technologies vehicles

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Using renewable energy in heating networks more efficiently
09.02.2016 | FIZ Karlsruhe – Leibniz-Institut für Informationsinfrastruktur GmbH

nachricht From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes
08.02.2016 | Purdue University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New study: How stable is the West Antarctic Ice Sheet?

Exceeding critical temperature limits in the Southern Ocean may cause the collapse of ice sheets and a sharp rise in sea levels

A future warming of the Southern Ocean caused by rising greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere may severely disrupt the stability of the West...

Im Focus: Superconductivity: footballs with no resistance

Indications of light-induced lossless electricity transmission in fullerenes contribute to the search for superconducting materials for practical applications.

Superconductors have long been confined to niche applications, due to the fact that the highest temperature at which even the best of these materials becomes...

Im Focus: Wbp2 is a novel deafness gene

Researchers at King’s College London and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in the United Kingdom have for the first time demonstrated a direct link between the Wbp2 gene and progressive hearing loss. The scientists report that the loss of Wbp2 expression leads to progressive high-frequency hearing loss in mouse as well as in two clinical cases of children with deafness with no other obvious features. The results are published in EMBO Molecular Medicine.

The scientists have shown that hearing impairment is linked to hormonal signalling rather than to hair cell degeneration. Wbp2 is known as a transcriptional...

Im Focus: From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes

Pollens, the bane of allergy sufferers, could represent a boon for battery makers: Recent research has suggested their potential use as anodes in lithium-ion batteries.

"Our findings have demonstrated that renewable pollens could produce carbon architectures for anode applications in energy storage devices," said Vilas Pol, an...

Im Focus: Automated driving: Steering without limits

OmniSteer project to increase automobiles’ urban maneuverability begins with a € 3.4 million budget

Automobiles increase the mobility of their users. However, their maneuverability is pushed to the limit by cramped inner city conditions. Those who need to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Travel grants available: Meet the world’s most proficient mathematicians and computer scientists

09.02.2016 | Event News

AKL’16: Experience Laser Technology Live in Europe´s Largest Laser Application Center!

02.02.2016 | Event News

From intelligent knee braces to anti-theft backpacks

26.01.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Travel grants available: Meet the world’s most proficient mathematicians and computer scientists

09.02.2016 | Event News

Body temperature triggers newly developed polymer to change shape

09.02.2016 | Materials Sciences

Using renewable energy in heating networks more efficiently

09.02.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>