Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Uprated Siemens D3 wind turbine implements sum of design and operational experiences

12.03.2014
  • Improved direct-drive technology with enhanced performance
  • Increased energy yield of up to 4 percent
  • Rotors with diameters of 101, 108 and 113 meters drive the 3.2 MW generator

Siemens Energy has uprated its D3 onshore platform wind turbines. The new SWT-3.2-101, SWT-3.2-108 and SWT-3.2-113 machines feature improved performance from 3.0 to 3.2 megawatts (MW) and implement the sum of design and operational experiences. The uprated products will enter serial production by the end of 2014. They will be available with 101 and 108 meter rotors for IEC class IA sites, and a 113 meter rotor for IEC class IIA sites. The 3 MW version will remain available for project sites with lower wind speeds.


Proven platform, refined technology: The uprated Siemens D3 wind turbines combine experience and innovation.

Simplicity and efficiency were the key words when Siemens developed its first commercial direct drive turbine in 2009. Following five years of experience and a large number of D3 wind turbines installed worldwide, the fundamental approach remains the same, but the technology continues to be refined. The uprated Siemens D3 wind turbines represent a classical wind turbine evolution, combining the reliability of a proven and tested concept with cutting edge technology development. Improvements in the turbine control system and increased efficiency through the use of stronger magnets are the key factors that allowed Siemens to get more power out of the D3 drivetrain.

The uprating underlines the structural reserves already found in the construction of Siemens' gearless wind turbines. "One important goal of our development work is to utilize innovation to further tap the technical potential of our products," says Henrik Stiesdal, CTO of Siemens Wind Power. "Rotors, structures and performance have been tested intensively to simulate more than 20 years of lifetime stress. This resulted in a new product generation which offers the reliability of the predecessor while delivering up to 4 percent more energy yield."

Wind power and the associated service activities are part of Siemens' Environmental Portfolio. Around 43 percent of the company's revenues are generated by green products and solutions. That makes Siemens one of the world's leading providers of eco-friendly technology.

More information about the trade fair appearance is available at www.siemens.com/energy/ewea2014

The Siemens Energy Sector is the world's leading supplier of a complete spectrum of products, services and solutions for power generation in thermal power plants and using renewables, power transmission in grids and for the extraction, processing and transport of oil and gas. In fiscal year 2013 (ended September 30) the Energy Sector had revenues of EUR 26.6 billion and received new orders totaling approximately EUR 28.8 billion, and posted a profit of approximately EUR 2.0 billion. On September 30, 2013, Siemens' Energy Sector had a workforce of about 83,500. Further information is available at: http://www.siemens.com/energy

Reference Number: EWP201403030e

Contact

Mr. Bernd Eilitz
Energy Sector

Siemens AG

Lindenplatz 2

20099  Hamburg

Germany

Tel: +49 (40) 2889-8842

Bernd Eilitz | Siemens Energy Sector

Further reports about: CTO D3 Energy IEC SWT-3 Wind construction processing rotors structures wind turbines

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Ultra-flat circuits will have unique properties
26.07.2016 | Rice University

nachricht Did you know that UV light helps to ensure safe bathing during the summer months?
25.07.2016 | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-assembling nano inks form conductive and transparent grids during imprint

Transparent electronics devices are present in today’s thin film displays, solar cells, and touchscreens. The future will bring flexible versions of such devices. Their production requires printable materials that are transparent and remain highly conductive even when deformed. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have combined a new self-assembling nano ink with an imprint process to create flexible conductive grids with a resolution below one micrometer.

To print the grids, an ink of gold nanowires is applied to a substrate. A structured stamp is pressed on the substrate and forces the ink into a pattern. “The...

Im Focus: The Glowing Brain

A new Fraunhofer MEVIS method conveys medical interrelationships quickly and intuitively with innovative visualization technology

On the monitor, a brain spins slowly and can be examined from every angle. Suddenly, some sections start glowing, first on the side and then the entire back of...

Im Focus: Newly discovered material property may lead to high temp superconductivity

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

While studying purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, researchers discovered an unconventional charge density wave on its surface.

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Continental tug-of-war - until the rope snaps

Breakup of continents with two speed: Continents initially stretch very slowly along the future splitting zone, but then move apart very quickly before the onset of rupture. The final speed can be up to 20 times faster than in the first, slow extension phase.phases

Present-day continents were shaped hundreds of millions of years ago as the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart. Derived from Pangaea’s main fragments Gondwana...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

GROWING IN CITIES - Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Gardening

15.07.2016 | Event News

SIGGRAPH2016 Computer Graphics Interactive Techniques, 24-28 July, Anaheim, California

15.07.2016 | Event News

Partner countries of FAIR accelerator meet in Darmstadt and approve developments

11.07.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

World first demo of labyrinth magnetic-domain-optical Q-switched laser

28.07.2016 | Information Technology

New material could advance superconductivity

28.07.2016 | Materials Sciences

CO2 can be stored underground for 10 times the length needed to avoid climatic impact

28.07.2016 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>