Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Underwater Turbine Harvests Tidal Energy

24.06.2011
As reported in the latest edition of "Pictures of the Future", Siemens is also turning to tidal power as it strives to exploit alternative forms of energy.

The company has recently secured a stake in SeaGen, the world's first commercial power plant to generate electricity from tidal energy. Commissioned in 2008, the 1.2 MW plant is located in the Irish Sea and can provide around 1,500 households with electricity.


This power is generated by two large underwater rotors driven by the strong tidal currents that flow during ebb and flood. Siemens acquired a ten percent holding in the operator company, Marine Current Turbines, in 2010.

A larger plant, with an output of 8 MW, is due for completion off the coast of Scotland by 2014. This will be able to supply some 8,000 households with electricity generated from tidal energy.According to the International Energy Agency, as many as 800 billion kilowatt-hours a year could be generated worldwide by means of marine currents.

That is around one-third more than Germany’s annual power production and enough to supply 250 million households.

SeaGen is located off the town of Strangford, in Northern Ireland, where powerful tidal currents flow through a narrow strait. The plant consists of a tower three meters in diameter, which is anchored to the seabed at a depth of 30 meters and rises to a greater or lesser extent above sea level, depending on the tide.

Below the surface, the tidal current drives twin rotors of 16 meters in diameter fixed to the tower. Together, these cover an area of around 400 square meters. In order to be able to exploit the tidal current in both directions — ebb and flood — the rotor blades are pitched through 180 degrees when the tide turns.

Despite being around twice as expensive as a comparable offshore windpark, tidal energy systems do have a number of advantages. Matching the 6,000 megawatt-hours a year generated by SeaGen would require an offshore wind turbine of almost twice the rating. Moreover, tidal energy and other marine currents can be predicted with considerable accuracy and are therefore much more dependable than wind or solar power. The holding in Marine Current Turbines forms part of the Siemens environmental portfolio, which generated around €28 billion in sales for the company in fiscal 2010.

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Researchers pave the way for ionotronic nanodevices
23.02.2017 | Aalto University

nachricht Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor
22.02.2017 | Toyohashi University of Technology

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists reach back in time to discover some of the most power-packed galaxies

28.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Nano 'sandwich' offers unique properties

28.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Light beam replaces blood test during heart surgery

28.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>