Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Swansea Engineering team pioneer Smart Electricity Meter

02.10.2008
The Power Electronics team from Swansea University’s School of Engineering has developed one of the world’s most advanced Smart Electricity Meters.

And the team is now supplying nearly 1.5MWh per year of free ‘Green electricity’ to the University, helping to reduce its carbon footprint.

The team, based within the Electronic Systems Design Centre, implemented their prototype Smart Meter to highlight the potential of electricity metering technologies in the near future.

The Smart Meter is to be the focal point for a consumer’s personal energy queries. It monitors their energy consumption, giving information not just through a traditional power reading, but in a user-friendly way by displaying animated graphics of money on a large clear screen on the meter.

It also goes one step further than most other potential Smart Meters in that it monitors individual power circuits in the home, including upstairs lighting, downstairs lighting and kitchen sockets.

The team believes there is also the possibility to monitor individual appliances when the technology is adopted further.

The presentation of consumption information is complemented by the ability to show power generated from micro-renewable technologies in a ‘plug and play’ manner, similar to the wind turbine currently commercially available, and generic solar panels.

This is an effort to provide a simple, easy to set up method for people with no expertise in Power Electronics.

The Smart Meter is linked to a number of solar panels on the roof of the University’s Engineering building through a power converter.

The power delivered from the solar panels is monitored within the meter to allow the ‘Green energy’ produced to be reviewed in an easy to understand way.

This allows clear indications whether the renewable technology has been a beneficial purchase and the likely financial performance from the initial investment.

The meter also has communication abilities, allowing the readings of power consumption and generation to be instantly available to the supplier and to the consumer via web pages, wireless in-home displays, or potentially even a television channel.

Richard Lewis, a leading researcher on the Swansea Smart Meter team, said: “The time for complacency is over! Swansea University, through its team and initiatives, is leading the effort in making energy awareness a top priority and is working to provide the tools to do it.

“We are currently looking to create a fully functional prototype from the current demonstration unit and plan to begin residential trials within the next 18 months.”

Interest in Smart Metering technologies has been sparked by a number of television commercials highlighting the availability of Smart Meters to business, but the residential sector still has some way to go.

Small scale trials are still underway and the adoption of Smart Metering in the residential sector could be a few years away.

The Swansea team are looking to be the UK pioneers, by offering metering technologies to those who wish to be early adopters.

Dr Petar Igic, who is leading the Energy and Power Electronics research within the University’s School of Engineering, said: “The project is one of a number of Welsh Assembly Government Knowledge Exploitation Fund research projects being undertaken in Wales and facilitated by the Welsh Energy Research Centre (WERC) to ensure Wales is at the forefront of current energy technologies.

“Smart Electricity Metering is a key part of the Energy Efficiency research theme, since making more efficient and more responsible use of the electric power generated is as important as finding renewable energy sources.”

Mark Durdin, Energy and Environmental Engineer in Estates Services at Swansea University, added: “This is an important development in metering. Each one of us needs to do our bit to reduce consumption and costs, but we can only do this if we know what is consuming the energy.”

Bethan Evans | alfa
Further information:
http://www.swansea.ac.uk/engineering

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cell with 21.9 % Efficiency: Fraunhofer ISE Again Holds World Record
20.02.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE

nachricht Six-legged robots faster than nature-inspired gait
17.02.2017 | Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Impacts of mass coral die-off on Indian Ocean reefs revealed

21.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Novel breast tomosynthesis technique reduces screening recall rate

21.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Use your Voice – and Smart Homes will “LISTEN”

21.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>