Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Solar-powered Technology for the Swiss Railroad

12.12.2011
Siemens is equipping a large part of the track network of Switzerland's federal railroad (SBB) with its ETCS train control system.

In a contract scheduled to run until 2017, some 430 switch towers and over 9,000 signaling elements are to be upgraded in line with the European Train Control System (ETCS).


More than half of the lineside electronic units supplied are to be powered exclusively by solar cells and will therefore be energy self-sufficient. Compared to an installation of conventional solutions, this will result in power savings for SBB of over 850,000 kilowatt-hours a year. The order is worth a total of €125 million and also covers support for the installed signaling systems over a period of 25 years.

Train control systems supplement the visible signals used to inform train drivers whether they can proceed and the speed at which they may travel. Such systems also transmit signals by radio and, if the driver does not react, automatically apply the brakes of the train. There are currently around 20 incompatible train control systems in use on Europe's railroads. As a consequence, locomotives often have to be switched at borders. The ETCS creates a standard and is used for all new installations. Any upgrades of existing track and trains are carried out as required.

Trainguard from Siemens Mobility and Logistics provides a complete portfolio of solutions for fitting trains and tracks with ETCS-compatible equipment. The elements of the system include so-called Eurobalises — radio beacons mounted on the track to transmit data to an antenna fixed under the train — and lineside electronic units, which transmit information to the balises.

Faced with the need to upgrade its existing signaling systems, SBB opted to switch to ETCS. One major challenge is to replace existing train control systems without a power supply. These serve to transmit a total of three signals — "Go," "Stop," and "Warning" — to the train via magnetic induction. To solve this problem, Siemens has developed a lineside electronic unit equipped with solar cells that generate sufficient energy to transmit information.

This solution not only reduces overall electricity consumption but also saves the cost of installing cables to over 5,000 signaling elements. In areas where more complex data, such as speed information, has to be transmitted, conventional lineside electronic units have been installed. The upgrade will also implement a standard for the switchgear installed in 430 switch towers, where three generations of technology are in use.

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Positrons as a new tool for lithium ion battery research: Holes in the electrode
22.02.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cell with 21.9 % Efficiency: Fraunhofer ISE Again Holds World Record
20.02.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Positrons as a new tool for lithium ion battery research: Holes in the electrode

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

New insights into the information processing of motor neurons

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Healthy Hiking in Smart Socks

22.02.2017 | Innovative Products

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>