Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Smoothly moving industrial robots save energy

04.06.2014

Siemens wants to further reduce the power consumption of manufacturing robots in the automotive industry.

One approach to this problems deals with movement patterns that require less acceleration energy, as was reported in the latest issue of the magazine "Pictures of the Future".

Working with Volkswagen and Fraunhofer Gesell­schaft as part of the Green Carbody Technologies (InnoCaT) innovation alliance, Siemens studied the motion sequences of manufacturing robots. The partners developed a simulation model that calculates the best trajectories for robots from the standpoint of energy efficiency.

Tests have shown that this approach can reduce energy consumption by up to half. Goal is to develop a software program that can be used to reprogram existing manufacturing robots to operate in a more energy-efficient manner, without making changes to the production process.

... more about:
»arms »conditions »electricity »mechanical »movement

Manufacturing robots make an automotive factory fast and efficient, but they also consume large quantities of electricity. Particularly in body shell production, where numerous robots are deployed, they account for more than half of the total energy consumed. One approach to saving energy involves the control system.

Today's robots are extremely jerky in their movements. They move their arms along straight lines and brake abruptly at every change of direction before turning and accelerating again. This costs a great deal of drive energy and stresses the mechanics.

In the laboratory, the engineers analyzed a robot's energy consumption in different work steps. They wanted to know the extent to which changes of direction influence power consumption, and determine the parameters that result in the best movement patterns in terms of energy consumption.

This analysis yielded new algorithms for a simulation model that calculates optimal motion trajectories. Based on the lab tests, they found a savings potential of between 10 and 50 percent when the robot's arms move evenly along curved paths. Furthermore, the mechanical parts are placed under less stress, resulting in lower maintenance costs and fewer downtimes.

In the automotive industry it is extremely important that numerous manufacturing robots, which often hand over work to one another in a matter of seconds, operate together smoothly. Long tests under realistic conditions showed that optimized movement patterns can lower energy consumption by up to 50 percent, even with the same cycle times.

A software module that automatically programs a robot's power consumption for a given work process, while also accommodating the interplay with adjacent machines, is under test. Automation is important: It is the only economically feasible way to reprogram thousands of manufacturing robots in a single factory.

Siemens plans to integrate such a module into its Tecnomatix manufacturing software. This will allow existing robots to be easily and safely reprogrammed to consume less energy without requiring new investments in hardware.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews

Further reports about: arms conditions electricity mechanical movement

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Squeezing every drop of fresh water from waste brine
30.05.2017 | University of California - Riverside

nachricht EU research project DEMETER strives for innovation in enzyme production technology
30.05.2017 | Deutsches Biomasseforschungszentrum

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New Method of Characterizing Graphene

Scientists have developed a new method of characterizing graphene’s properties without applying disruptive electrical contacts, allowing them to investigate both the resistance and quantum capacitance of graphene and other two-dimensional materials. Researchers from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the University of Basel’s Department of Physics reported their findings in the journal Physical Review Applied.

Graphene consists of a single layer of carbon atoms. It is transparent, harder than diamond and stronger than steel, yet flexible, and a significantly better...

Im Focus: Strathclyde-led research develops world's highest gain high-power laser amplifier

The world's highest gain high power laser amplifier - by many orders of magnitude - has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde.

The researchers demonstrated the feasibility of using plasma to amplify short laser pulses of picojoule-level energy up to 100 millijoules, which is a 'gain'...

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

3D printer inks from the woods

30.05.2017 | Life Sciences

How circadian clocks communicate with each other

30.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Graphene and quantum dots put in motion a CMOS-integrated camera that can see the invisible

30.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>