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Siemens to equip Deutsche Telekom's largest data center

24.03.2014

Siemens' Low and Medium Voltage Division will install power distribution technology in a new data center operated by Deutsche Telekom in Biere, Germany.

The company will also supply power distribution technology for the existing twin data center in Magdeburg. The order covers the delivery of medium and low voltage switchgear, transformers, building control technology and busbar trunking systems.

Secure power supply and distribution is crucial for maximum equipment availability. With a server footprint of more than 5,600 square meters and a power demand of approximately 120 megavolt amperes (MVA), the data center in Biere is expected to be one of the largest in Germany after all expansion stages have been completed. Commissioning is scheduled for the spring of 2014.

The data center in Biere, 30 kilometers south of Magdeburg, will be built by a group of companies. T-Systems, a subsidiary of Deutsche Telekom, will lease and regularly modernize the data center once it is complete. The new building is intended to form a twin data center with an existing data center in Magdeburg.

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All files and programs will thus be saved in parallel, especially for cloud applications. If one data center fails, the twin center will jump in, which will increase failure tolerance. After the building is completed, a total floor area equal to nearly eight soccer fields, including the IT areas for the computer systems, will be available in both locations. A data center consumes enough electricity to power a small city.

To maintain safe, comprehensive power distribution within the data centers, Siemens will supply a 30-kV NXPLUS gas-insulated medium voltage switchgear with eight fields as well as  20/10-kV NXPLUS C gas-insulated medium voltage switchgear with a total of 78 fields, including the protective systems, Along with the 8 Geafol transformers, (2,500 kVA, each), Siemens will also supply the Sivacon 8PS busbar trunking system. The busbars measure a total of 4,200 meters in length. The Sivacon low-voltage switchgear (540 fields) will be supplied by Siemens' franchise partner ESA Grimma.

A power outage of no more than 10 milliseconds can cause massive disturbances in data center systems. Siemens power distribution system are designed specifically for the high demand of data centers. They meet maximum standards of security and efficiency.

Thanks to their design, busbars are especially suitable for data centers since they are particularly robust and take up very little space. They also have a lower fire load compared to cables. The busbars can be easily upgraded when the data centers are expanded; their connections can be varied flexibly and at low cost.

The rapid growth in IT-assisted business processes worldwide is generating enormous volumes of data, which requires more and more storage space and server capacity for processing. Data centers throughout the world provide this storage space and make it available as a "cloud." In cloud computing, files or applications are no longer stored on a fixed computer but are located on servers in data centers, where they can be accessed from all over the world.

A supply of electricity is essential for operating data centers and the servers, network components and data lines they contain. A reliable supply of electricity must be available not only for the IT but also for infrastructure functions such as cooling and air conditioning, fire monitoring and firefighting, security and control, lighting, elevators, drives and motors.

Siemens at Light + Building: www.siemens.com/light-building

The Siemens Infrastructure & Cities Sector (Munich, Germany), with approximately 90,000 employees, focuses on sustainable and intelligent infrastructure technologies. Its offering includes products, systems and solutions for intelligent traffic management, rail-bound transportation, smart grids, power distribution, energy efficient buildings, and safety and security. The Sector comprises the divisions Building Technologies, Low and Medium Voltage, Mobility and Logistics, Rail Systems and Smart Grid. For more information http://www.siemens.com/infrastructure-cities

The Siemens Low and Medium Voltage Division (Erlangen, Germany) serves the entire product, system, and solutions business for reliable power distribution and supply at the low- and medium-voltage levels. The Division's portfolio includes switchgear and busbar trunking systems, power supply solutions, distribution boards, protection, switching, measuring and monitoring devices as well as energy storage systems for the integration of renewable energy into the grid. The systems are supplemented by communications-enabled software tools that can link power distribution systems to building or industry automation systems. Low and Medium Voltage ensures the efficient supply of power for power grids, infrastructure, buildings, and industry. Additional information is available at: http://www.siemens.com/low-medium-voltage

Reference Number: ICLMV20140302e

Contact

Mr. Heiko Jahr
Low and Medium Voltage Division

Siemens AG

Freyeslebenstr. 1

91058  Erlangen

Germany

Tel: +49 (9131) 7-29575

Heiko Jahr | Siemens Infrastructure & Cities Sector

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