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Polarisation technology to enable tripwire detection

08.06.2007
A sensor will be developed that can remotely detect command and trip wires attached to explosive devices following the award of an £800,000 contract by the UK Ministry of Defence to QinetiQ. The 18 month research contract aims to develop a highly sensitive electro optic sensor that is capable of detecting command and trip wires of less than a millimetre in diameter that are used to detonate conventional munitions, mines and many improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

The project aims to identify the best means of optical detection and ultimately to help develop a reliable, portable system which can rapidly detect tripwires when operating in a minefield or mined areas. Trip and command wires can be extremely difficult to detect and devices using these wires currently represent a significant threat to British military personnel in vehicles and on foot patrol in Iraq and Afghanistan. The MOD research contract will see QinetiQ develop a sensor, based on polarisation technology, that could be used in a range of man-portable detection devices and that can effectively detect different types of trip wires in a variety of operational scenarios, environments and weather conditions.

“This research project is an important step in trying to automate the detection of tripwires,” said Simon Gadd, the MOD's Mobility Integrated Project Team Leader. He added: “The project aims to identify the optimum means of optical detection and ultimately to help develop a reliable, portable system which can rapidly detect tripwires when operating in a minefield or mined areas.”

Previous MOD funded research carried out by QinetiQ had shown that the use of polarisation information in imaging systems could dramatically improve target detection, particularly in cluttered environments plus overcome several forms of camouflage, concealment and deception. Significant improvements in signal-to-clutter ratios have been demonstrated against anti-tank and anti-personnel mines in the visible and infrared wavebands.

For this programme, QinetiQ has partnered with Qioptiq, a recognised independent manufacturer of military electro optic sensors, to conduct activities aimed at de risking any consequent equipment programme that could lead to the mass production of a miniaturised sensor.

“Reliable non contact tripwire detection is needed to ensure acceptable tempo of land operations,” added Jon Salkeld, MD of QinetiQ’s optronics division. “An effective electro-optic sensor would provide a valuable tool to assist with minefield clearance. QinetiQ’s strong polarimetric imaging team bring many years of experience of developing prototype sensors to deliver innovative imaging solutions. We look forward to working with Mobility IPT on this challenging programme.”

QinetiQ’s leading team has many years expertise in configuring, operating and understanding of polarimetric sensors and this has led to the development of a number of sensors to measure polarimetric signatures from the UV to the far infrared wavebands.

Douglas Millard | alfa
Further information:
http://www.QinetiQ.com

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