Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

European research network develops novel hydrogen storage materials

09.11.2006
The Marie Curie Research Training Network COSY (Complex Solid State Reactions for Energy Efficient Hydrogen Storage) was launched on November, 1st, 2006.

The network, which receives €2.5 million in funding from the European Union, was established to develop new types of reactive light-metal hydride composites that can be used for more effective hydrogen storage. During the project’s four-year duration, GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht will coordinate the collaboration between the 13 participating research institutes from seven European countries.

It’s all a question of storage

Hydrogen can easily be produced by using renewable sources of energy, which will have to replace fossil fuels once the latter are depleted at some point in the future. However, the use of hydrogen as an environmentally friendly source of energy for mobile devices such as automobiles, laptops and cameras is still hindered by a number of factors, including the excessive size and weight of existing hydrogen storage systems. If it becomes possible to store hydrogen more effectively than is currently the case, the gas would serve as an ideal energy carrier for mobile applications. Over the next four years, the scientists involved in the COSY network will be working to achieve this goal by developing new nano-structured composites of various light-metal hydrides for use as storage materials. “Light-metal hydrides are solid materials that chemically bind hydrogen atoms and release them again when heated,” explains Professor Rüdiger Bormann, Director of the Institute for Materials Research at GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht and coordinator of COSY. “The ‘reactive hydride composites’ discovered by the scientists at GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht will allow us to significantly increase the storage density. By storing hydrogen in solids, we can avoid a number of material- and safety-related technological difficulties, such as those encountered during high-pressure storage of gaseous hydrogen or the storage of liquid hydrogen at low temperatures.”

The COSY network aims to prepare and optimise the new reactive hydride composites for use in hydrogen storage systems of mobile applications. To make this possible, the COSY scientists investigate how the light-metal hydrides and hydride composites can be produced economically, characterise the micro- and nano-structures generated during production, evaluate and optimise the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and release, and model these processes.

Training of young scientists and international cooperation

In addition to research, the Marie Curie network COSY also focuses on training and further education as well as on the exchange of young scientists throughout Europe. Generally, doctoral candidates at COSY work in at least two of the network’s institutes. In addition to an individualised non-scientific training program, the postgraduates’ curriculum includes research assignments of several weeks’ duration at partner institutes within the network, as well as a series of training workshops on various hydrogen technology topics.

The following countries and institutions take part in the COSY network:

Germany (Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht)
United Kingdom (University of Oxford)
France (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility ESRF/Grenoble, Institut National Polytechnique INP/Grenoble, Laboratoire de Réactivité et de Chimie des Solides LRCS/Amiens)
Italy (University of Torino)
Netherlands (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, University of Twente)
Switzerland (Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for Hydrogen & Energy, Dübendorf)

Spain (Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla/Seville, University of Barcelona)

Torsten Fischer | alfa
Further information:
http://www.gkss.de
http://www.cosy-net.eu/

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Team develops fast, cheap method to make supercapacitor electrodes
18.07.2017 | University of Washington

nachricht Magic off the cuff
11.07.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

Leipzig HTP-Forum discusses "hydrothermal processes" as a key technology for a biobased economy

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers create new technique for manipulating polarization of terahertz radiation

20.07.2017 | Information Technology

High-tech sensing illuminates concrete stress testing

20.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

First direct observation and measurement of ultra-fast moving vortices in superconductors

20.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>