Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

European research network develops novel hydrogen storage materials

09.11.2006
The Marie Curie Research Training Network COSY (Complex Solid State Reactions for Energy Efficient Hydrogen Storage) was launched on November, 1st, 2006.

The network, which receives €2.5 million in funding from the European Union, was established to develop new types of reactive light-metal hydride composites that can be used for more effective hydrogen storage. During the project’s four-year duration, GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht will coordinate the collaboration between the 13 participating research institutes from seven European countries.

It’s all a question of storage

Hydrogen can easily be produced by using renewable sources of energy, which will have to replace fossil fuels once the latter are depleted at some point in the future. However, the use of hydrogen as an environmentally friendly source of energy for mobile devices such as automobiles, laptops and cameras is still hindered by a number of factors, including the excessive size and weight of existing hydrogen storage systems. If it becomes possible to store hydrogen more effectively than is currently the case, the gas would serve as an ideal energy carrier for mobile applications. Over the next four years, the scientists involved in the COSY network will be working to achieve this goal by developing new nano-structured composites of various light-metal hydrides for use as storage materials. “Light-metal hydrides are solid materials that chemically bind hydrogen atoms and release them again when heated,” explains Professor Rüdiger Bormann, Director of the Institute for Materials Research at GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht and coordinator of COSY. “The ‘reactive hydride composites’ discovered by the scientists at GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht will allow us to significantly increase the storage density. By storing hydrogen in solids, we can avoid a number of material- and safety-related technological difficulties, such as those encountered during high-pressure storage of gaseous hydrogen or the storage of liquid hydrogen at low temperatures.”

The COSY network aims to prepare and optimise the new reactive hydride composites for use in hydrogen storage systems of mobile applications. To make this possible, the COSY scientists investigate how the light-metal hydrides and hydride composites can be produced economically, characterise the micro- and nano-structures generated during production, evaluate and optimise the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and release, and model these processes.

Training of young scientists and international cooperation

In addition to research, the Marie Curie network COSY also focuses on training and further education as well as on the exchange of young scientists throughout Europe. Generally, doctoral candidates at COSY work in at least two of the network’s institutes. In addition to an individualised non-scientific training program, the postgraduates’ curriculum includes research assignments of several weeks’ duration at partner institutes within the network, as well as a series of training workshops on various hydrogen technology topics.

The following countries and institutions take part in the COSY network:

Germany (Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht)
United Kingdom (University of Oxford)
France (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility ESRF/Grenoble, Institut National Polytechnique INP/Grenoble, Laboratoire de Réactivité et de Chimie des Solides LRCS/Amiens)
Italy (University of Torino)
Netherlands (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, University of Twente)
Switzerland (Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for Hydrogen & Energy, Dübendorf)

Spain (Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla/Seville, University of Barcelona)

Torsten Fischer | alfa
Further information:
http://www.gkss.de
http://www.cosy-net.eu/

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Organic-inorganic heterostructures with programmable electronic properties
29.03.2017 | Technische Universität Dresden

nachricht Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics
23.03.2017 | North Carolina State University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers shoot for success with simulations of laser pulse-material interactions

29.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindling

29.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundation

29.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>