Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Smart coatings project aims to bring more readable display screens

18.04.2006


Smart coatings that should allow cash machine, mobile phone and laptop display screens to be read much more easily in bright sunlight could soon be on the way, thanks to a major research project unveiled today.



Scientists from the University of Abertay Dundee and the University of Greenwich are joining forces with specialist screen and thin film coatings manufacturers in the £600,000 ENDSENSE project, which is part-funded by the Department of Trade & Industry.

The two-year project aims to develop new coatings for flat-panel display screens that will be able to sense light levels and adjust the output of the display to improve readability and efficiency.


Specialist custom electronics manufacturers Micro Circuit Engineering Ltd (Tewkesbury and Newmarket) and Thin Film Solutions Ltd (Glasgow) will develop new designs of screen assemblies with novel coatings, and the two universities will collaborate to provide sophisticated usability testing and computer modelling to test the new designs.

The results of the project will enable traditional and emerging display technologies to be more viewable and energy efficient in a wide range of ambient light conditions. As well as better displays for a wide variety of applications, the research team believes that its new technology could also open up other applications in solar cells and photovoltaic devices.

Dr Colin Cartwright of Abertay University’s School of Computing & Creative Technologies, said: “In conventional displays, separate filters in the system govern the optical performance of the display’s uniformity, brightness and contrast. What we hope to do with the new approach is to develop thin film coating materials that combine several optical functions to produce a more sensitive, higher performance, more energy efficient and lower cost display.

“Integrating many optical functions, possibly with conflicting mechanical, thermal, electrical and visual requirements is a major technical challenge, so we need rigorous computer modeling of all the variables. This will give us an integrated design tool that can be used for existing and future smart display technologies, and give the UK an unrivalled capability for producing smart optics for display applications.”

Professor Chris Bailey at Greenwich University will contribute multi-physics modeling, optimization and reliability. He said: “Manufacturers of devices incorporating displays will be able to specify and integrate optical components into their products that are a major advance on current display systems. By optimizing the optics of the displays, they will be able to offer greatly improved readability in high brightness conditions, slim form factors, good contrast ratios and wide viewing angles in their products. In addition, the feedback and control offered by the new smart coatings will reduce energy consumption by two to three times, extend service life and reduce ownership costs.”

The worldwide market for displays of all kinds is estimated to be more than £20 billion, giving any technological improvement a huge sales potential. Manufacturers of cash machines, automotive and marine displays have already expressed interest in the outcome of this project.

Kevin Coe | alfa
Further information:
http://endsense.cms.gre.ac.uk/
http://www.abertay.ac.uk

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Linear potentiometer LRW2/3 - Maximum precision with many measuring points
17.05.2017 | WayCon Positionsmesstechnik GmbH

nachricht First flat lens for immersion microscope provides alternative to centuries-old technique
17.05.2017 | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>