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Quickplacer, the fastest robot in the world


Fatronik has launched the most rapid robot in the world at the BIEMH (International Machine-Tool Biennial) in Bilbao.

What is involved here is a high-performance handling robot the structure of which is basically four actuators working in a co-ordinated manner with the goal of achieving maximum dynamic performances.

The robot has four degrees of freedom, displacements along three translations and rotates on its vertical axis. It is a cylinder with a diameter of 1200mm and a height of 250mm. Its rotational capacity covers ±200º, which enables positioning an object in any orientation-position.

This robot is characterised by its high dynamics, with accelerations of 15G, enabling it to pick up and position over 200 items per minute. Its workload capacity is aimed at the manipulation of variously shaped objects up to a weight of 2 Kg.

This robot is aided by a vision system capable of guiding its movements. The vision system, available in both black and white and in colour, is responsible for locating the shape and the orientation-position of the objects and, as a function of the received programming, gives orders for the robots movements. It is also possible to co-ordinate the whole system with moving belts in such a way that the robot can pick up a moving object and also position it on a moving belt.


The Quickplacer robot is the most rapid in the world. Its high acceleration and braking capacity, 5 times more than that of a Formula 1 racing car, makes it world leader in production capacity.

It special structure and the characteristics of the elements make its speed and acceleration optimum, increasing productivity by 20% with respect to currently existing solutions.


The technological structure and capacities of this robot make it ideal for handling tasks in a multitude of sectors such as in food and agriculture, the hygiene sector, beauty care, health care or electronic components.

Its design is optimised for small-sized objects – up to 2 Kg – in very varied tasks. The possible tasks to which this robot can be applied are as varied as the following:

• Positioning of chocolates in individually-shaped places
• Packaging of bars of chocolate/turron
• Packaging of biscuits individually or in groups
• Quality control in the processing of vegetables (combined with a colour vision system)
• Packaging of peppers
• Packaging of lipstick bars
• Packaging of baby towelettes
• Feeding various products (fish, meat, CDs,…) to flowpack machines.

Irati Kortabitarte | alfa
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