Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Smaller microchips that consume less energy

10.09.2004


To develop ever-smaller chips that consume less. These are the indispensable requirements of the current market for portable applications such as mobile telephone technology and biomedical systems, obtaining correct and trouble-free operation of the devices over the maximum possible duration of time. One of the techniques which, in fact, can be used for the development of this type of reduced-size, low-consumption microchip is one analysed by Carlos Aristóteles de la Cruz in his PhD defended at the Public University of Navarre. The thesis is titled, “Design and Implementation of Very Low Voltage Square-Root Domain Circuits with On-chip Tuning”.

Silicon prototypes

The SRD (Square-Root Domain) techniques is one of the methods enabling the design of chips or integrated circuits with low power sources, i.e. circuits that can function suitably in those situations where there is a low level of power supply. The technique is based on the design of circuits the internal processing system of which is non-lineal – although the input-output relation is lineal.



The PhD not only presents simulations of designed systems, but also provides experimental results obtained from manufactured prototypes of all the circuits and systems, which demonstrate the possibility of being included in practice designs. Moreover, second-order and non-lineal analyses were carried out on the circuits in order to achieve a better understanding of the functioning of these circuits and systems.

Less consumption and space

The integrated circuits are made up of transistors that unite basic cells and these, in turn, are grouped together forming integrated circuit systems. In this way, the contributions of the thesis, both to the construction of the novel basic cells as well as to the configuration of systems developed therefrom.

Thus, the thesis offers a basic cell design for chips which enables a power supply at a lower voltage. It points out that present cells operating on 3.3 volts can be reduced to 1.5 volts. To this end, conventional techniques of basic cell design have been used (through translineal links). Specifically, floating power supplies are used, introduced as an integral part of the translineal links without modifying its principal function of creating SRD systems. This contribution to circuitry not only enables the desired operation to take place at low tension but also allows the cells to have a good dynamic range.

Likewise, the PhD has developed a completely new technique for designing non-lineal basic cells. This technique enables a considerable simplification of the internal circuits of these cells, avoiding redundant components present with previous techniques. Moreover, the resulting SRD filters have a greater bandwidth, take up less surface area on the chip, require less power consumption and offer approximately the same characteristics and yields as the previous models.

The technique developed by Carlos de la Cruz also enables, with slight modifications, obtaining other useful d.c. circuits. A novel set of circuits has been developed, amongst which are ones which calculate a geometric average, squared power, one- and four-quadrant multipliers and a RMS-DC converter.

Finally, the PhD involved the design of an SRD filter with a tuning system for compensating for errors introduced into the filter parameters.

Garazi Andonegi | alfa
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com
http://www.elhuyar.com

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics
23.03.2017 | North Carolina State University

nachricht TU Graz researchers show that enzyme function inhibits battery ageing
21.03.2017 | Technische Universität Graz

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

When Air is in Short Supply - Shedding light on plant stress reactions when oxygen runs short

23.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics

23.03.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles

23.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>