Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Smaller microchips that consume less energy


To develop ever-smaller chips that consume less. These are the indispensable requirements of the current market for portable applications such as mobile telephone technology and biomedical systems, obtaining correct and trouble-free operation of the devices over the maximum possible duration of time. One of the techniques which, in fact, can be used for the development of this type of reduced-size, low-consumption microchip is one analysed by Carlos Aristóteles de la Cruz in his PhD defended at the Public University of Navarre. The thesis is titled, “Design and Implementation of Very Low Voltage Square-Root Domain Circuits with On-chip Tuning”.

Silicon prototypes

The SRD (Square-Root Domain) techniques is one of the methods enabling the design of chips or integrated circuits with low power sources, i.e. circuits that can function suitably in those situations where there is a low level of power supply. The technique is based on the design of circuits the internal processing system of which is non-lineal – although the input-output relation is lineal.

The PhD not only presents simulations of designed systems, but also provides experimental results obtained from manufactured prototypes of all the circuits and systems, which demonstrate the possibility of being included in practice designs. Moreover, second-order and non-lineal analyses were carried out on the circuits in order to achieve a better understanding of the functioning of these circuits and systems.

Less consumption and space

The integrated circuits are made up of transistors that unite basic cells and these, in turn, are grouped together forming integrated circuit systems. In this way, the contributions of the thesis, both to the construction of the novel basic cells as well as to the configuration of systems developed therefrom.

Thus, the thesis offers a basic cell design for chips which enables a power supply at a lower voltage. It points out that present cells operating on 3.3 volts can be reduced to 1.5 volts. To this end, conventional techniques of basic cell design have been used (through translineal links). Specifically, floating power supplies are used, introduced as an integral part of the translineal links without modifying its principal function of creating SRD systems. This contribution to circuitry not only enables the desired operation to take place at low tension but also allows the cells to have a good dynamic range.

Likewise, the PhD has developed a completely new technique for designing non-lineal basic cells. This technique enables a considerable simplification of the internal circuits of these cells, avoiding redundant components present with previous techniques. Moreover, the resulting SRD filters have a greater bandwidth, take up less surface area on the chip, require less power consumption and offer approximately the same characteristics and yields as the previous models.

The technique developed by Carlos de la Cruz also enables, with slight modifications, obtaining other useful d.c. circuits. A novel set of circuits has been developed, amongst which are ones which calculate a geometric average, squared power, one- and four-quadrant multipliers and a RMS-DC converter.

Finally, the PhD involved the design of an SRD filter with a tuning system for compensating for errors introduced into the filter parameters.

Garazi Andonegi | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging
25.10.2016 | Colorado State University

nachricht Did you know that infrared heating is an essential part of automotive manufacture?
25.10.2016 | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Etching Microstructures with Lasers

25.10.2016 | Process Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>