Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Making the future with nanoelectronics: a strategy for Europe

30.06.2004


To become the world’s most competitive powerhouse, Europe must lead the transition of the micro-electronics sector to the next generation of nano-electronics, with co-ordinated public and private investments of at least €6 billion per year. This is the message from a report drawn up by CEOs of leading companies and research organisations and presented today to European Research Commissioner Philippe Busquin and Enterprise and Information Society Commissioner Erkki Liikanen. Smarter and smaller electronics at the nano-meter scale managing vast amounts of data are becoming key components for many applications, from household appliances and consumer goods to automotive transport, health care and security, and ultimately ambient intelligence. The “Vision 2020: Nano-electronics at the centre of change” will lead to the launch of the European Nano-electronics Initiative Advisory Council (ENIAC) to be chaired by STMicroelectronics’ President and CEO Pasquale Pistorio. This European public-private partnership will identify a strategic research agenda for nano-electronics in Europe and implement it.

“Nanoelectronics is a strategic sector for Europe, with a potential for creating a significant number of highly skilled jobs and boosting growth and competitiveness in most other industrial sectors,” Commissioner Liikanen said. Today’s strategic initiative is vital if Europe’s industry is to remain at the forefront of global developments.”

“Europe cannot afford to miss the next generation of electronic applications that will be for our future economy what oil is for today’s economy,” Research Commissioner Busquin said. “Leading the transition to nano-electronics is a challenge that requires our best researchers to work together and our public and private investors to profit from economies of scale. Smaller and more functional electronic components make complex electronics disappear and help people to be creative and fully participate in the knowledge society.”



From microelectronics to nanoelectronics

The overall value of the microelectronics industry is around €140 billion, with electronics at €800 billion. In 2002, funding for micro-electronics in the Asia-Pacific region reached 62% of total capital spending, whereas it amounted to only 8% in Europe. The components on an integrated circuit are now so small that they are no longer measured in micrometers but in nanometers.

ENIAC is one of the Technology Platforms which are intended to define a common research agenda and mobilise a critical mass of national and European public and private resources. Developing nanoelectronics requires an interdisciplinary approach, world-class research and production facilities, and greater co-ordination of research.

Key vision 2020 recommendations

To achieve leadership in this sector, Europe must develop:

  • a competitive supply chain,
  • a research infrastructure for visionary and industrially relevant research, strategic public-private partnerships to mobilise a critical mass of resources,
  • a favourable legal and financial environment,
  • a skilled research, design and production workforce resulting from a highly specialised educational system.

Fabio Fabbi | EU Commission
Further information:
http://europa.eu.int
http://www.cordis.lu/ist/eniac
http://www.cordis.lu/nanotechnology

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Robot on demand: Mobile machining of aircraft components with high precision
06.12.2016 | Fraunhofer IFAM

nachricht IHP presents the fastest silicon-based transistor in the world
05.12.2016 | IHP - Leibniz-Institut für innovative Mikroelektronik

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

NTU scientists build new ultrasound device using 3-D printing technology

07.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

The balancing act: An enzyme that links endocytosis to membrane recycling

07.12.2016 | Life Sciences

How to turn white fat brown

07.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>