Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Solving the problems of electric motors run from power converters

09.12.2003


In this PhD thesis, Eugenio Gubía proposed a solution for the problems of electric motors run from power converters. Controlling motors and electric generators by means of power converters has negative effects with the presence of overtvoltages and high-frequency currents throughout the installation. These effects accelerate the ageing process of the motors and, moreover, can provoke faults in the correct operating of the control circuits.



Thus, in his PhD, Mr Gubia has developed a generic method that can be adapted to each one of the possible installations with the view to identifying the origin of the high-frequency problems and, moreover, to analyse possible solutions. Likewise, the proposed method can be adapted to the design stage of a new installation.
In order to design this method, it was necessary to set up simulation models to reproduce the behaviour of motors, transformers, cables and the power converter, using frequencies in the order of 10 megaHertz. These frequencies are much higher then the tens of kiloHertz used in classical models.

Concretely, in this work it has been possible to reproduce the overvoltages produced as a result of using long connection cables between the inverter and the motor given that, the longer the cable, the greater the probability of overvoltage. This type of cable can be found, for example, in wind-powered generators, which incorporate the generator (the motor) in the upper part of the structure and the power converter at the base.



Also in this thesis, the problem of earthing currents in the installation and the supply grid was investigated, a problem known as electromagnetic interferences or conducted EMI. These have become highly important of late as they can provoke a fault in other units connected to the same earthing system. In fact, the regulations which limit the amount of such currents are increasingly stricter.

Eugenio Gubía has put forward that solutions to both problems, overvoltages and interferences, require the use of filters, the study of which, in this work, has been approached from a perspective of wave theory in transmission lines.
If the electromagnetic interferences do not have a technique or device for their quantification at the heart of the operation, neither can the efficacy of the filters applied to eliminate said effects be measured.

To this end, the work developed in this PhD offers a precise methodology for the analysis of both overvoltages and electromagnetic interferences and that, moreover, enables an efficient filter design.

The author of the thesis is currently researching the possibility of applying this methodology to other fields of power electronics.


Contact :
Iñaki Casado Redin
Nafarroako Unibertsitate Publikoa
inaki.casado@unavarra.es
(+34) 948 16 97 82

Garazi Andonegi | Basque research
Further information:
http://www.basqueresearch.com/berria_irakurri.asp?Gelaxka=1_1&Berri_Kod=370&hizk=I
http://www.unavarra.es

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Organic-inorganic heterostructures with programmable electronic properties
30.03.2017 | Technische Universität Dresden

nachricht Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics
23.03.2017 | North Carolina State University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

'On-off switch' brings researchers a step closer to potential HIV vaccine

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Penn studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsies

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

An LED-based device for imaging radiation induced skin damage

30.03.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>