Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Battery power

05.02.2003


Consumer demand for lighter, more powerful handheld devices such as laptop computers and mobile phones is growing year on year. The EUREKA project 3D STRUCTURES has addressed one of the key requirements – cheaper and lighter batteries that last longer.

French lead partner SCPS (Societé de Conseil et de Prospective Scientifique S.A.) has developed a new kind of conductive metallic foam capable of replacing heavy metallic parts. A cylindrical block of foam is immersed in an aqueous solution thereby coating all the pores with conductive material. The cylinder can be peeled forming a strip of foam which can then be electroplated. Next, the plastic foam is burnt out, leaving the metallic shape, i.e. the 3D structure that can be used as electrodes, the charge-collecting part in batteries for applications in computers and cars.

For example, a copper foam will be used in heat exchangers, where it can replace heavy and cumbersome fins, making a more efficient and compact unit. It will also be utilised in the next generation of hybrid cars with 36V batteries, where more power will be needed for acceleration and deceleration.



Robert Rouget, a Director of SCPS and a 3D STRUCTURE Project Manager, describes the new process as “cheaper, faster and more efficient. The cost is much lower because it uses simple equipment such as plastic containers, at room temperature, under normal pressure.”

The developments achieved by SCPS have raised the interest of a venture capital company that specialises in electrochemistry. They have joined other investors, such as Business Angels and company managers, in financing this and other projects. “They are of course involved in all projects developed by the company,” says Rouget. “All projects, including 3D STRUCTURES, need to be totally self-funded up to the point where we can demonstrate that the process is operational.” This approach works very well for both investor and company as they can see tangible evidence that the project will move from pilot to feasibility phase.

Rouget was very happy with SCPS’s involvement in a EUREKA project. He described how there was less paperwork and how smaller projects were possible with as few as two participants: “EUREKA projects are easy to set up and, whilst there is room for R&D, they are focussed on applications.”

Nicola Vatthauer | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eureka.be/success-stories

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion
24.07.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot
21.07.2017 | Stanford University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA mission surfs through waves in space to understand space weather

25.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Strength of tectonic plates may explain shape of the Tibetan Plateau, study finds

25.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

The dense vessel network regulates formation of thrombocytes in the bone marrow

25.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>