Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Silicon transistors will encounter pressure from nanoelectronics

19.11.2002


The future of nanoelectronics looks promising. Built with nanotubes and various self-assembling molecular structures, this technology may revolutionize the electronic world by replacing the silicon transistor in approximately ten years.



Chemically synthesized nano building blocks are expected to replace semiconductor logic and memory devices and target niche applications over the next decade.

"In 20 to 50 years, we will likely see wide-ranging use of self-assembly," says Technical Insights Director of Research Leo O’Connor.


Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is currently favored by chipmakers, and some companies are expected to use EUV to replace 157 nm scanners in the second half of the decade. Japanese electronic companies have joined forces to develop low-energy electron-beam proximity projection lithography.

Currently, chipmakers are working to make the 157 nm lithography technology operational by 2003. In doing so, they have come up against many obstacles such as the availability of calcium fluoride for lens manufacturing and contamination of optical elements.

Researchers are working to address these difficulties. Recently, supporters of various forms of next-generation lithography reported progress on 157 nm optical, projection e-beam lithography and EUV lithography. Although expensive, EUV scanners will work at the 13.5 nm wavelength and take manufacturers over several process generations.

Although chip technology plays a crucial role in the semiconductor industry, researchers believe that it is only a matter of time before the switch from lithographed silicon chips to self-assembled nanoelectronics takes place.

In anticipation of the eventual change, researchers at various universities are experimenting with different technologies. At Delft University in the Netherlands, for example, researchers have built basic logic circuits with carbon nanotubes, while at Harvard University a group of researchers used indium phosphide nanowires to build the same types of devices.

Molecular self-assembly is not without its share of problems. Despite challenges, it seems clear that nanotechnology will have a profound impact on the future development of many sectors, particularly that of electronics, which demands technologies that enable faster processing of data at lower costs.


New analysis by Technical Insights, a business unit of Frost & Sullivan (www.Technical-Insights.frost.com), featured in its Nanotech Alert subscription service, discusses pioneering research being undertaken for the development of this emerging technology.

Frost & Sullivan is a global leader in strategic growth consulting. Acquired by Frost & Sullivan, Technical Insights is an international technology analysis and consulting business that produces a variety of technical news alerts, newsletters, and reports. This ongoing growth opportunity analysis of nanoelectronic technologies is covered in Nanotech Alert, a Technical Insights subscription service, and in Nanodevices, a Frost & Sullivan Technical Insights technology report. Technical Insights and Frost & Sullivan also offer custom growth consulting to a variety of national and international companies. Executive summaries and interviews are available to the press.

Nanotech Alert

Contact:
USA:
Julia Rowell
P: 210.247.3870
F: 210.348.1003
E: jrowell@frost.com

APAC:
Pramila Gurtoo
DID : (603) 6204 5811
Gen : (603) 6204 5800
Fax : (603) 6201 7402
E: pgurtoo@frost.com

Julia Rowell | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.frost.com
http://www.Technical-Insights.frost.com

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Waste from paper and pulp industry supplies raw material for development of new redox flow batteries
12.10.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

nachricht Low-cost battery from waste graphite
11.10.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>