Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Innovation on the move

04.07.2013
The A*STAR Institute of Microelectronics and Japan’s Shikino High-Tech Co., Ltd have united to develop improved technologies for motion sensing

Motion sensing is fast becoming a ‘must-have’ function in consumer electronics today. For instance, motion-sensing capability is incorporated into digital cameras and camcorders, enabling image stabilization and augmentation with information such as where a shot was taken and the direction that the camera was pointing. In game consoles and smartphones, motion is used to control game play and to enable user interface functionality.

Gyro sensors, also known as gyroscopes, are the motion-sensing devices that enable such functionality by sensing changes in angular velocity. In addition to their use in consumer electronics, gyro sensors can be integrated with portable medical devices and sports equipment, allowing patients to be monitored remotely by medical staff and athletes’ motion to be tracked for training purposes.

Joining efforts with a Japanese camera systems and image-processing module developer, Shikino High-Tech Co., Ltd, the A*STAR Institute of Microelectronics (IME) has signed a research agreement to pioneer an energy-efficient, high-performance application-specific integrated circuit intellectual property (ASIC IP) block for a gyro sensor to be installed in commercial handheld devices. Yuaki Osada, president of Shikino High-Tech, believes that the IME is an excellent choice of collaborative partner for the project due to the institute’s proven and outstanding capabilities, particularly in the area of analog technology development.

“It is a valuable opportunity for Shikino High-Tech to work with the IME in this advanced technology project,” says Osada. The agreement marks the first formal collaboration in Singapore for Shikino High-Tech, which boasts more than 25 years of R&D experience in Japan and an impressive record of technological inventions and patents. Osada is confident in the success of this initial research project and anticipates further exciting collaborations with the IME in the future.

The IME, founded in 1991, is a recognized leader in the development of commercial technologies and has particular strengths the areas of microelectronics and semiconductors. Part of the institute’s core mission is to provide support to industry. Its multidisciplinary approach to research, expertise in technology transfer and state-of-the-art facilities have led to the establishment of collaborations with more than 50 multinational firms and across every sector of the electronics industry.

Dim-Lee Kwong, executive director of the IME, is enthusiastic about the venture with Shikino High-Tech. Noting the IME’s extensive research experience with Japanese companies, he is confident that the partnership will benefit both Shikino High-Tech and A*STAR. “This new collaboration will no doubt provide a strategic platform for the IME’s researchers to leverage existing capabilities in the development of innovative gyro sensor technologies.”

This new strategic partnership between the IME and Shikino High-Tech is a further testament to Singapore’s position as a preferred country for Japanese companies to invest and expand in. In recent years, the number of collaborations formed between local establishments and Japanese companies has been growing steadily. According to the 2012 Singapore Business Formation Statistics Report, Japan ranks among the top investors in the Republic for that year.

About the Institute of Microelectronics

The Institute of Microelectronics (IME) is a research institute of the Science and Engineering Research Council of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). Positioned to bridge the R&D between academia and industry, the IME’s mission is to add value to Singapore’s semiconductor industry by developing strategic competencies, innovative technologies and intellectual property; enabling enterprises to be technologically competitive; and cultivating a technology talent pool to inject new knowledge to the industry. Its key research areas are in integrated circuits design, advanced packaging, bioelectronics and medical devices, MEMS, nanoelectronics, and photonics.

A*STAR Research | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.research.a-star.edu.sg
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cell with 21.9 % Efficiency: Fraunhofer ISE Again Holds World Record
20.02.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE

nachricht Six-legged robots faster than nature-inspired gait
17.02.2017 | Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Switched-on DNA

20.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>