Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

GE Power Conversion to Supply one of the World’s Most Advanced Wind Turbine Test Facilities

15.03.2013
• Advanced Nacelle Test Bench will enable fault ride-through tests and grid simulation

• Equipment incorporates GE's innovative direct drive permanent magnet motor and flexible modular inverter system

• Contract confirms GE's reputation as a leader in drive technology for wind power and test systems

GE's Power Conversion business (NYSE: GE) has signed a turnkey contract with the Lindoe Offshore Renewables Center (LORC), a Danish center for test of renewable energy technology, for the construction, commissioning and handover of one of the world's most advanced facilities to test wind turbine nacelles with an output power of up to 10 Megawatts (MW). The Lindoe Nacelle Testing project (LNT) will be located in the Lindø Industrial Park on Funen, Denmark's fourth-largest island. It will be ready for first tests in 2014.


The Lindoe Nacelle Testing (LNT)project is one of the world’s most advanced facilities to test wind turbine nacelles with an output power of up to 10 Megawatts (MW).
(Photo: GE Power Conversion: GEPCPR152)

The function tester will incorporate GE’s drivetrain, grid simulation, control systems and foundation work. It is comprised of: medium voltage switch gear, transformers, inverter system DDPM (direct drive permanent magnet) motor, HMI (human-machine interface) and foundation. GE will carry out the installation, commissioning, and remote service for the project. The medium voltage inverter system is a further development of GE’s existing MV7000 series, and is one of the most compact medium voltage inverters on the market. The MV7000 is based on tried-and-tested GE technology using dynamic control properties and low grid interference.

“GE is extremely pleased and proud to be a partner for LORC in building an outstanding test bench that will lead the wind industry into the future of a safer supply of renewable power”, says Franz Hubl, Global Business Leader - Test Systems, at GE Power Conversion. “As a world leader in this field, we have significant experience to contribute.”

The new nacelle tester will enable LORC to test the functionality and performance of wind turbine nacelles by using a specially designed adapter that enables the turbine hub and all field operational software and hardware—including pitch control—to be included in the test. It will open up a wide range of opportunities to test wind turbine controllers inside the nacelle, using highly realistic test conditions at 33kV level, which is unique in the test system business.

“We choose to work with GE because of their extensive knowledge in the wind power industry and their worldwide references for test systems,” says Ove Poulsen, Chief Executive Officer at LORC. “GE also provided us with a technical solution that best fits the requirements for this project. Users will be able to carry out a full range of tests on their equipment without having to adapt their turbine software or hardware. Because the test bench can be connected to a “virtual” wind farm (created by separate system), it will be able to operate as HIL – Hardware in the Loop.”

The test bench has a modular design that will enable it to be adapted to future needs. For example, its grid simulator power can be increased at a later date and thereby increase its functionality to carry out extended FRT (Fault Ride Through) tests - simulations of wind turbine systems to remain connected to the supply during grid malfunctions and to help stabilize it.

LNT will be able to meet the demands for testing of tomorrow’s offshore wind turbines in a facility where national grid codes can be tested in combination with loads caused by rapidly changing wind speed conditions. Electrical malfunctions and turbine protection systems have historically led to unforeseen excessive loadings of mechanical components and thereby reduced expected life-time. At LNT it will be possible to verify the stress levels under numerous different load cases, thereby helping to improve long term reliability.

GE was helped in winning the contract by the fact that it already has worldwide references in test systems for the wind power industry, and that it was able to offer LORC a technical solution that best fits its requirement. It is alone in producing direct drive permanent magnet motors in the double-digit megawatt range suitable for wind turbines, it offers a flexible automation and visualization system, and it owns important intellectual property rights on grid simulation.

Paul Floren
GE Power Conversion
t +33 1 53 59 28 44
paul.floren@ge.com
Stephanie Bush
EMG
t +31 164 317 036
sbush@emg-pr.com

Stephanie Bush | EMG
Further information:
http://www.ge.com

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Multiregional brain on a chip
16.01.2017 | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

nachricht Researchers develop environmentally friendly soy air filter
16.01.2017 | Washington State University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

Im Focus: Bacterial Pac Man molecule snaps at sugar

Many pathogens use certain sugar compounds from their host to help conceal themselves against the immune system. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now, in cooperation with researchers at the University of York in the United Kingdom, analyzed the dynamics of a bacterial molecule that is involved in this process. They demonstrate that the protein grabs onto the sugar molecule with a Pac Man-like chewing motion and holds it until it can be used. Their results could help design therapeutics that could make the protein poorer at grabbing and holding and hence compromise the pathogen in the host. The study has now been published in “Biophysical Journal”.

The cells of the mouth, nose and intestinal mucosa produce large quantities of a chemical called sialic acid. Many bacteria possess a special transport system...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Water - as the underlying driver of the Earth’s carbon cycle

17.01.2017 | Earth Sciences

Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

17.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Smart homes will “LISTEN” to your voice

17.01.2017 | Architecture and Construction

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>