Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Freshly baked rolls from the climate chamber

Market-ready technique uses 50 percent less energy. Research Project NanoBAK on euronews.
How is it possible to obtain an excellent quality of bakery products and simultaneously save energy during the baking process? In the research project „NanoBAK“, the ttz Bremerhaven is developing a climate chamber which solely uses finest mist to produce baked goods. This novel baking technique saves a lot of energy. Euronews presents in a video how the bakery Sikken applies the NanoBAK technology.

The production of bakery goods goes along with high energy consumption. This is not only threatening the environment but also increases the production costs of bakeries, which is in turn reflected by higher consumer prices for bread, rolls & co. In response to this issue, the research project NanoBAK developed a fermentation chamber with an innovative humidification system which leads to an increased product quality and a significantly reduces energy demand during production. A short euronews movie presents this technique and shows how the traditional bakery Sikken (Emden) utilises it in their production. For more information on the project and the video, please visit the ttz website ( or euronews.

Inside view of a climate chamber with Nano-Aerosol humidification system, produced by the partner USK Ungermann-System-Kälte GmbH & Co. KG.

Picture: ttz Bremerhaven

Within the scope of NanoBAK, the ttz Bremerhaven and its project partners developed and evaluated a novel and market-ready climate chamber with a Nano-Aerosol Humidification System: ultrasound sets water molecules into oscillation, whereby smallest droplets are formed which are then channeled into the fermentation chamber. Here the fine mist gets into the dough. In the end, the constant distribution of humidity in the fermentation chamber allows the production of bakery goods on a high quality level. Not only does the novel technique increase the durability of baking products, it does also give rolls an appealing shine, a better fenestration and a consistent crust.

Additionally and more importantly, the technology leads to considerable energy savings. The humidification system, which usually has the second largest energy demand in the fermentation process, becomes negligible with the NanoBAK technology (only 2 % of conventional humidifiers). The energy demand of the whole fermentation process is reduced by up to 50% when using the NanoBAK technology. Using the NanoBAK technology will therefore provide substantial economical and ecological advantages to the entire baking industry.

The aim of the NanoBAK project is to test, evaluate and optimize the innovative humidification system. Crucial to achieving this aim is the MicroTec technology which targets the production of high-quality and long-lasting bakery products by the realization of a constant humidity distribution and the reduction of energy consumption during the fermentation process.

NanoBAK is a collaborative project funded by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Program.

ttz Bremerhaven is an independent provider of research services and operates in the field of application-oriented research and development. Under the umbrella of ttz Bremerhaven, an international team of experts is working in the areas of food, environment and health.

ttz Bremerhaven
Christian Colmer
Head of Communication and Media
Fischkai 1
D-27572 Bremerhaven
Tel.: +49 (0)471 48 32 -124
Fax: +49 (0)471 48 32 – 129

Christian Colmer | idw
Further information:

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging
25.10.2016 | Colorado State University

nachricht Did you know that infrared heating is an essential part of automotive manufacture?
25.10.2016 | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Etching Microstructures with Lasers

25.10.2016 | Process Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>