Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Energy transmission for railroad vehicles without overhead wires

30.06.2014

Induction instead of overhead wires

Anyone who frequently uses trains knows this to be true: overhead lines are prone to faults, increasingly leading to delays and cancellations. An alternative to this is energy transmission without overhead lines.

In the framework of the Allianz DLR@Uni-Stuttgart, scientists from two institutes at the University of Stuttgart as well as the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) are researching inductive (contact-free) systems that are to replace the overhead lines one day.

For this purpose the State of Baden-Württemberg has set aside 860,000 Euros. “With these funds the state government is supporting the researchers at DLR and the University of Stuttgart in exploiting the enormous potentials of contact-free energy transmission for fewer noise emissions, less wear and tear and maintenance work and less energy consumption“, explained the Finance and Economy Minister Nils Schmid on the occasion of the presentation of the research report. As the next step the scientists want to develop a demonstrator that will undoubtedly also be of interest for the industry.

... more about:
»DLR »Electrical »Energy »Machine »Vehicle »existing »railroad »vehicles

Overhead lines for electrically operated railroad vehicles are exposed to the weather and other environmental influences that could lead to a high degree of wear and tear and pose a risk for the environment in the case of damage. In addition the lines and pantographs are a significant source of noise and the high aerodynamic air resistance has a significant impact on the energy consumption.

Induction instead of overhead lines is therefore the goal of the project for which the DLR Institute for Vehicle Concepts has joined forces with the Institutes of Electrical Energy Conversion (IEW) and Machine Elements (IMA, railroad vehicle technology and reliability technology divisions) at the University of Stuttgart. The scientists are thereby relying on a principle according to which electric cars and trams can already be charged contact-free with limited transmission power.

Its mode of operation corresponds to that of a sliced transformer, whereby the primary coil is integrated in the drive and the secondary coil is located in the vehicle. The energy transfer is done via a generated magnetic field and is possible over the complete length of the vehicle on a large scale. In this respect each part segment of long trains with a distributed driving power can be supplied separately with energy without an elaborate energy supply line through the vehicle being necessary. Through this each carriage that has its own drive can for example be moved autonomously in the shunting area.

Whilst the IMA dedicated itself in particular to the mechanical design and the integration of the new components in the vehicle as well as the reliability and availability of the energy transfer, the IEW was particularly involved with the design of the energy transfer system as well as the supply electronics and the electrical components. No wear and tear, less susceptibility to faults and as high an efficiency factor as possible (over 90 percent) and also with far more efficiency were thereby of primary interest. Moreover, attention was paid to maintaining a downward compatibility with existing rail systems as far as possible and to continuing to improve train control systems.

“The inductive energy transfer developed in this interdisciplinary project enables an efficient and robust supply of railroad vehicles with electrical energy“, is how Prof. Johann-Dietrich Wörner, Chairman of the Board of the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) expressed it. An essential viewpoint is that the railroad vehicles through a hybrid energy supply can be driven on new routes as well as on the existing railroad network.“

Further information
Prof. Bernd Bertsche, University of Stuttgart, Institute for Machine Elements, Reliability Technology Division, Tel.: 0711/685-66165, Email: bernd.bertsche (at) ima.uni-stuttgart.de
Prof. Dieter Bögle, University of Stuttgart, Institute for Machine Elements, Railroad Vehicle Technology Division, Tel. 0711/685-66098, Email: dieter.boegle (at) ima.uni-stuttgart.de
Prof. Nejila Parspour, University of Stuttgart, Institute of Electrical Energy Conversion, Tel.:0711/685-67818, Email: nejila.parspours (at) iew.uni-stuttart.de
Dr. Joachim Winter, DLR-Institute for Vehicle Concepts, Project Manager of the project “Energy transfer without overhead lines“, Tel: 0711/6862-274, Email: joachim.winter (at) dlr.de.

Andrea Mayer-Grenu | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: DLR Electrical Energy Machine Vehicle existing railroad vehicles

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Better combustion for power generation
31.05.2016 | DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

nachricht Fast, stretchy circuits could yield new wave of wearable electronics
30.05.2016 | University of Wisconsin-Madison

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attosecond camera for nanostructures

Physicists of the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich in collaboration with scientists from the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have observed a light-matter phenomenon in nano-optics, which lasts only attoseconds.

The interaction between light and matter is of key importance in nature, the most prominent example being photosynthesis. Light-matter interactions have also...

Im Focus: Worldwide Success of Tyrolean Wastewater Treatment Technology

A biological and energy-efficient process, developed and patented by the University of Innsbruck, converts nitrogen compounds in wastewater treatment facilities into harmless atmospheric nitrogen gas. This innovative technology is now being refined and marketed jointly with the United States’ DC Water and Sewer Authority (DC Water). The largest DEMON®-system in a wastewater treatment plant is currently being built in Washington, DC.

The DEMON®-system was developed and patented by the University of Innsbruck 11 years ago. Today this successful technology has been implemented in about 70...

Im Focus: Computational high-throughput screening finds hard magnets containing less rare earth elements

Permanent magnets are very important for technologies of the future like electromobility and renewable energy, and rare earth elements (REE) are necessary for their manufacture. The Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM in Freiburg, Germany, has now succeeded in identifying promising approaches and materials for new permanent magnets through use of an in-house simulation process based on high-throughput screening (HTS). The team was able to improve magnetic properties this way and at the same time replaced REE with elements that are less expensive and readily available. The results were published in the online technical journal “Scientific Reports”.

The starting point for IWM researchers Wolfgang Körner, Georg Krugel, and Christian Elsässer was a neodymium-iron-nitrogen compound based on a type of...

Im Focus: Atomic precision: technologies for the next-but-one generation of microchips

In the Beyond EUV project, the Fraunhofer Institutes for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen and for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering IOF in Jena are developing key technologies for the manufacture of a new generation of microchips using EUV radiation at a wavelength of 6.7 nm. The resulting structures are barely thicker than single atoms, and they make it possible to produce extremely integrated circuits for such items as wearables or mind-controlled prosthetic limbs.

In 1965 Gordon Moore formulated the law that came to be named after him, which states that the complexity of integrated circuits doubles every one to two...

Im Focus: Researchers demonstrate size quantization of Dirac fermions in graphene

Characterization of high-quality material reveals important details relevant to next generation nanoelectronic devices

Quantum mechanics is the field of physics governing the behavior of things on atomic scales, where things work very differently from our everyday world.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Networking 4.0: International Laser Technology Congress AKL’16 Shows New Ways of Cooperations

24.05.2016 | Event News

Challenges of rural labor markets

20.05.2016 | Event News

International expert meeting “Health Business Connect” in France

19.05.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Better combustion for power generation

31.05.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Stick insects produce bacterial enzymes themselves

31.05.2016 | Life Sciences

In a New Method for Searching Image Databases, a Hand-drawn Sketch Is all it Takes

31.05.2016 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>