Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cost efficient Diode Lasers for Industrial Applications

15.04.2016

The »Brilliant Industrial Diode Lasers« (BRIDLE) project has been finished successfully after 42 months of intense research activities. BRIDLE was made possible by funding from the European Commission. The seven project partners finished their work at the end of February 2016. The project was coordinated by »DILAS Diodenlaser GmbH« (Germany), the project partners are located in Germany, UK, Switzerland, France and Finland. BRIDLE targeted a major increase in the brightness achievable in direct diode laser systems, based on advances in diode laser and beam -combining technology. Throughout, the highest conversion was sought as was compatibility with low cost, volume manufacture.

Seven partners for various scientific issues


DWDM prototype consisting of actively cooled DFB mini-bars.

Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen.


Mounting of individually addressable diode lasers with rear and front facet access for CBC.

© CNRS-IO, Palaiseau / Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen.

Design and technological development of high performance diode lasers was performed by three partners within BRIDLE. First, the Ferdinand-Braun-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FBH) developed novel epitaxial designs and process technology.

Those developments enabled the use of broad area mini bars with a narrow stripe width of only 30 µm to operate with a brightness that is increased by at least a factor of two in comparison with state of the art chips with a 100 µm stripe width. Furthermore, highly brilliant narrow-stripe DFB diode lasers with monolithically-integrated surface gratings were developed and optimized to simultaneously deliver narrow spectrum (< 1nm), high power (5W), high efficiency (50%) within a low beam parameter product (< 2mm-mrad) for the first time.

... more about:
»Diode »Fraunhofer-Institut »ILT »Lasertechnik »lasers

For coherent coupling experiments, monolithically grating-stabilized tapered diode lasers were developed, with record (54%) conversion efficiency. Second, ridge waveguide diode lasers for coherent coupling experiments were developed by Modulight Inc., which deliver an output power of 1 W per emitter. Finally, design optimization was supported through detailed simulation work performed by University of Nottingham (UNott).

Based on the high brightness diode laser mini bars developed within the BRIDLE project, DILAS was able to simplify its well-known T-bar concept for 105 µm fibre coupling. Furthermore DILAS could increase the optical output power up to 300 W ex 100 µm. The modules wavelength’can be stabilized and used for dense wavelength multiplexing to further increase output power and brightness. The assembly process is fully automated.

Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT analyzed and compared different techniques for dense wavelength multiplexing. These techniques include different approaches based on surface gratings, simultaneous wavelength stabilization and multiplexing by use of dielectric filters and VBGs as well as DWDM of wavelength chirped DFB diode lasers by dielectric filters. Filters from different international manufacturers were tested thoroughly. For the first time, Fraunhofer ILT has developed concepts which can be used to implement and test compact modules in the medium power range of 10 W to 100 W output power, with a fiber having a core diameter of 35 µm and a numerical aperture of 0.2. 46 W were realized experimentally. A 7:1 fiber combiner (35/105 µm) was developed for further power scaling.

Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/Institut d’Optique (CNRS-IO) demonstrated a new architecture for passive coherent combining of diode laser with ridge lasers (delivered by Modulight) and tapered lasers (delivered by FBH). The set-up is based on the separation of the phase-locking stage, which takes place in an external cavity on the rear side of the lasers, and the beam combining stage ,which is achieved outside the cavity on their front side. This configuration demonstrates successively a combined power up to 7.5 W in a single beam from a bar of five high-brightness emitters, using a specifically designed diffractive combiner. Furthermore, the active coherent combining of five tapered amplifiers achieved a power of more than 11 W with a combining efficiency of 76%.

The University of Nottingham developed software tools that enable the investigation of coupling between external optics and the diode laser itself. These tools can be used to better understand coherent coupling, wavelength stabilization or parasitic back reflections. UNott developed a dynamic laser simulation tool for CBC diode laser systems. This tool is used in conjunction with external cavity models developed at CNRS-IO to investigate the nature and dynamics of the phase locking mechanisms in CBC laser systems. Furthermore, UNott’s laser simulation tool Speclase was coupled to external optical design software (ZEMAX®) for external cavity simulations at the subsystem level.

Industrial applications of the developed prototypes are investigated by Bystronic Laser AG and Fraunhofer ILT. For instance, lasers manufactured by DILAS are used for Selective Laser Melting of metals at Fraunhofer ILT.

For more information visit the BRIDLE project website ( www.bridle.eu )

Weitere Informationen:

http://s.fhg.de/svD

Petra Nolis | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

Further reports about: Diode Fraunhofer-Institut ILT Lasertechnik lasers

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Laser sensor LAH-G1 - optical distance sensors with measurement value display
15.08.2017 | WayCon Positionsmesstechnik GmbH

nachricht Engineers find better way to detect nanoparticles
14.08.2017 | Washington University in St. Louis

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>