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Complete Renewal of the Residual Current Operated Circuit Breaker

31.10.2013
Siemens is renewing their entire RCCB series, replacing it with 5SV switches.

The new switches come equipped with additional safety features, are easier to install, and can be retrofitted with additional functions at any time. The first 5SV switch models are available now: A new Type A RCCB for the German market, and a Type AC RCCB for the European market.


A new Type A RCCB of the 5SV series especially for the German market

These switch types have been developed specifically for applications in the residential and office building sector, and help protect against electricity accidents, equipment damage, and fires. The entire 5SV series will be available by the end of 2014.

A standardized busbar system facilitates faster and safer installation than in traditional wiring systems. With the aid of a latching slide, the switches can be conveniently mounted on or removed from a standard mounting rail in a busbar system. The touch protected, integrated contacts protect the installer from electrical shock when connecting the devices.For additional safety, the switching state is indicated with relevant markings on the handle or in a separate display window. For the easy insertion of pin busbars with connection wires up to 35 mm², the RCCBs come equipped with rectangular terminal clamps and funnel-shaped cable entries.

Standardized gaps between terminals in modular widths mean that the devices can optionally be connected via busbars on the top or on the bottom to other protection devices, e.g. line protection or AFDDs. Die basic function of the RCCBs can be easily extended with additional components, like auxiliary switches or fault signal contacts, open-circuit or undervoltage triggers.

Siemens furthermore supplies extensive data on 5SV RCCBs online for electrical layout planners, installers, and switchgear manufacturers to facilitate planning and project creation: You will find CAx data, like dimensional drawings and STEP models, image data, technical product information, and specification texts.

RCCBs are used in power networks up to 240/415 V AC. If a specific residual current is exceeded due to a defective electrical device, RCCBs disconnect the monitored circuit quickly and safely from mains supply, and offer direct and indirect touch protection. RCCBs furthermore help prevent fires caused by ground-fault currents. For many applications, the use of RCCBs has become mandatory in Germany (DIN VDE 0100-410). The new series 5SV residual current operated circuit breaker is certified for use in the European IEC market.

For more information on the subject of RCCBs please visit www.siemens.com/lowvoltage

Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/siemens_press

The Siemens Infrastructure & Cities Sector (Munich, Germany), with approximately 90,000 employees, focuses on sustainable technologies for metropolitan areas and their infrastructures. Its offering includes products, systems and solutions for intelligent traffic management, rail-bound transportation, smart grids, energy efficient buildings, and safety and security. The Sector comprises the divisions Building Technologies, Low and Medium Voltage, Mobility and Logistics, Rail Systems and Smart Grid. For more information, visit http://www.siemens.com/infrastructure-cities

The Siemens Low and Medium Voltage Division (Erlangen, Germany) serves the entire product, system, and solutions business for reliable power distribution and supply at the low- and medium-voltage levels. The Division's portfolio includes switchgear and busbar trunking systems, power supply solutions, distribution boards, protection, switching, measuring and monitoring devices as well as energy storage systems for the integration of renewable energy into the grid. The systems are supplemented by communications-enabled software tools that can link power distribution systems to building or industry automation systems. Low and Medium Voltage ensures the efficient supply of power for power grids, infrastructure, buildings, and industry. Additional information is available at: http://www.siemens.com/low-medium-voltage

Reference Number: ICLMV20131002e

Contact
Ms. Heidi Fleißner
Low and Medium Voltage Division
Siemens AG
Tel: +49 (941) 790-2212
heidi.fleissner​@siemens.com

Mr. Heiko Jahr
Low and Medium Voltage Division
Siemens AG
Freyeslebenstr. 1
91058 Erlangen
Germany
Tel: +49 (9131) 7-29575
heiko.jahr​​@siemens.com

Heidi Fleißner | Siemens Infrastructure
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/lowvoltage

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