Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bringing in the Sunshine with Sollectors on the Roof

14.06.2011
Siemens is planning to use an ingenious technology to bring daylight into building interiors.

The latest issue of the research magazine "Pictures of the Future" features a report on how this is to be achieved. Sunlight is collected by “sollectors” on the roof and fed into waveguides, which run throughout the building.


The waveguides emerge from the room ceilings, where they supply a special light that provides additional artificial lighting from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) if needed. The Siemens subsidiary Osram and its partners are building the prototype of such an LED light.

This direct utilization of sunlight is highly efficient. Between 50 and 70 percent of the captured light supplements the room lighting. In contrast, if you use the light to produce solar energy which is then used to power a conventional lamp, the light energy generated is only a few percent of the amount of energy originally collected.

The sollector is a square plate measuring just over half a meter on each side. A total of 900 lenses collect the sunlight and feed it into fiber optic cables. Ultraviolet radiation, which is damaging to the skin, and the infrared component, which heats up rooms, are filtered out. In strong sunlight, a sollector can supply a room with light equivalent to that produced by a dozen 60-watt light bulbs. The device was developed at the Georg Simon Ohm University of Applied Sciences in Nuremberg, Germany, and a startup founded by the university is already marketing the technology.

The LED version is now being produced in collaboration with Osram. The light from the fiber optic cables makes a flat lamp light up. The light from white LEDs is also directed onto the flat surface. Special sensors, which are adjusted in line with the light sensitivity of humans, register the point at which additional artificial light is needed. The spectral composition of natural light changes during the course of a day, so the color of the white LED light is varied depending on the time of day. Red light is added in the morning and evening, and the amount of blue is increased during the daytime.

Sollectors utilize only direct sunlight, not the diffuse radiation from an overcast sky, so it pays to use them in sunny regions in particular. Building inhabitants in such locations block the sun from entering the interior to keep rooms from becoming too warm and turn on the lights instead. In the future they may be able to capture sunlight and guide the brightness — without any warming infrared radiation — to where it is needed.

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens ResearchNews
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/researchnews

Further reports about: Applied Science LED Osram Roof Sollectors light-emitting diode

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Fraunhofer ISE Supports Market Development of Solar Thermal Power Plants in the MENA Region
21.02.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE

nachricht New tech for commercial Lithium-ion batteries finds they can be charged 5 times fast
20.02.2018 | University of Warwick

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Basque researchers turn light upside down

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Attoseconds break into atomic interior

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>