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ACORN-NS and CANARIE Go Green with Bullfrog Power

ACORN-NS, Atlantic Canada Organization of Research Networks in Nova Scotia, and CANARIE Inc. have partnered to bullfrogpower their operations collocated at Dalhousie University in Halifax Nova Scotia, with 100 per cent clean, renewable energy through Bullfrog Power. Choosing green electricity allows ACORN-NS and CANARIE to take a stand for renewable energy in the Maritimes, reduce their environmental impact, and help to create a cleaner world for today and tomorrow.

Bullfrog Power’s electricity comes exclusively from wind and hydro facilities that have been certified as low impact by Environment Canada under its EcoLogoM program—instead of from polluting sources like coal, oil, natural gas and nuclear. In the Maritime Provinces, Bullfrog Power currently sources from wind farms and low-impact hydro facilities in Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick. Bullfrog’s Maritime generators inject renewable electricity onto the regional grid to match the amount of power used by Bullfrog Power’s customers.

“Our members comprise the research innovation engine of Nova Scotia,” said Terry Dalton, ACORN-NS Chair. “The Information and Communications Technology sector is now the fastest growing sector for carbon emissions in the world. As such, we want to provide leadership and support of sustainable Green IT initiatives in Nova Scotia and internationally through our partnership with CANARIE and its global Green IT program. Bullfrogpowering our collocated advanced network operations at Dalhousie University is an effective way to achieve this.”

ACORN-NS operates the advanced research network in Nova Scotia and its Nova Scotia GigaPoP located at the Dalhousie University data centre, where CANARIE Inc. in partnership with ACORN-NS and Dalhousie collocate its CANARIE Network Node for the Province. CANARIE has funded four other ground-breaking Green IT projects aimed at reducing ICT’s carbon footprint and measuring the impact of ICT and cyberinfrastructure on university electric consumption.

Researchers increasingly need to collaborate and make use of advanced networks and computational capability internationally. The ICT industry is said to produce carbon emissions similar to that of the aviation industry. Organizations world over are taking measures to reduce their carbon emissions. You can find more stats and quick facts on carbon emissions from the ICT industry at


ACORN-NS, Atlantic Canada Organization of Research Networks in Nova Scotia, is Nova Scotia’s Advanced Research Network. As a member organization, ACORN-NS promotes the development and operation of cyberinfrastructure for Nova Scotia in support of research, education, health and innovation. ACORN-NS operates the Nova Scotia GigaPoP located at Dalhousie University and is one of 12 national regional networks providing access to the CANARIE Network.

ACORN-NS members include university, college, health, government and private organizations throughout Nova Scotia that support research, education, health and innovation for the growth of a knowledge-based economy and society in Nova Scotia. For additional information, please visit

CANARIE Inc. is Canada's Advanced Research and Innovation Network. Established in 1993, CANARIE manages an ultra high-speed network, hundreds of times faster than the internet, which facilitates leading-edge research and big science across Canada and around the world. More than 39,000 researchers at nearly 200 Canadian universities and colleges use the CANARIE Network, as well as researchers at institutes, hospitals, and government laboratories throughout the country. The CANARIE Network enables researchers to share and analyze massive amounts of data, which can lead to ground-breaking scientific discoveries. CANARIE's network, programs, and strategic partnerships with 12 regional networks in Canada, and 100 international networks in more than 80 countries, stimulate research that delivers economic, social, and cultural benefits to Canadians.

CANARIE is a non-profit corporation supported by membership fees, with major funding of its programs and activities provided by the Government of Canada. For additional information, please visit:

About Bullfrog Power:

Bullfrog Power, Canada’s 100 per cent green electricity provider, offers homes and businesses a clean, renewable electricity choice. Bullfrog’s electricity comes exclusively from wind and hydro facilities that have been certified as low impact by Environment Canada under its EcoLogoM program instead of from polluting sources like coal, oil, natural gas, and nuclear. Thousands of Canadian homes and businesses are doing their part to address climate change and air pollution by switching to green electricity with Bullfrog Power. Many ENGOs (environmental non-governmental organizations) and non-profits, including The David Suzuki Foundation, WWF-Canada and The Pembina Institute, have also bullfrogpowered their premises to show their support for advancing renewable energy. For additional information, please visit:

CANARIE Communications | Newswise Science News
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