Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A Tram that Withstands Desert Climates

15.07.2015

Siemens has successfully tested the desert suitability of a streetcar system that it developed specifically for the Emirate of Qatar.

Siemens performed the tests at the climate-wind tunnel of the Rail-Tec-Arsenal in Vienna, Austria, where it simulated the streetcar’s operation in Qatar’s summer heat. Despite an exterior temperature of 40 degrees Celsius and 30 percent humidity, the temperature inside the fully occupied streetcar was a comfortable 25 degrees.


Siemens is constructing a state-of-the-art turnkey tram system comprising 19 streetcars in Qatar's capital city of Doha. In the picture: the climate-wind tunnel of the Rail-Tec-Arsenal in Vienna, Austria.

In addition, passengers were always supplied with sufficient amounts of fresh air. Although the desert streetcar is based on the Avenio platform, it is also equipped with high-performance air conditioners, special roof-mounted shading systems, and very good insulation.

The Rail-Tec-Arsenal climate test lab, which is partly owned by Siemens, is a unique facility where trains up to 100 meters in length can be subjected to all kinds of weather and operating scenarios. A huge fan generates airstreams, and large fields of intense halogen lamps simulate the sun’s rays.

Users can set the humidity and create rain or snow. Passenger-related effects are simulated by air humidifiers and heat pads on the seats. The doors are opened and closed in accordance with the stops along the streetcar’s future route. To test the streetcar for Qatar, Siemens squeezed a complete 27-meter-long vehicle into the tunnel, where it was subjected to a variety of conditions.

No Overhead Lines Needed

Siemens is building a streetcar route that is more than 11 kilometers long in Qatar’s capital city, Doha. The system will be turnkey-ready and will include all of the associated infrastructure. The project includes the construction of 25 stations and a depot as well as the delivery of 19 state-of-the-art Avenio streetcars.

The Doha streetcar system will be Siemens’ first streetcar route to operate without overhead lines. The vehicles will instead be equipped with energy storage devices that will recharge themselves at stops through special roof conductor rails. The streetcar system is scheduled to enter service in 2016.

To accomplish this, Siemens developed the Sitras HES hybrid energy storage device, which combines a double-layer capacitor with a nickel-metal hydride battery. The storage device enables the streetcar to travel without overhead lines and also to recover braking energy.

As a result, a typical streetcar’s energy demand may be reduced by up to 30 percent and its CO2 emissions by up to 80 metric tons. The storage device enables the streetcar to travel up to 2.5 kilometers before it has to be recharged.

To ensure that the new streetcar route in Qatar requires no overhead lines, the distances between stops do not exceed this maximum range. The streetcar consumes electricity from the grid when it begins to move, as this requires an especially large amount of energy. After that, the electricity is supplied by the energy storage devices. In the climate-wind tunnel, Siemens also tested the charging cycles of the energy storage system under all of the climate conditions that are expected to occur in Qatar.
Christine Rüth


Mr. Dr Norbert Aschenbrenner

Editorial Office

Siemens AG
norbert.aschenbrenner@siemens.com


Mr. Florian Martini

Journalist Inquieries

Siemens AG
florian.martini@siemens.com

www.siemens.com

Christine Rüth | Siemens - Pictures of the Future

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects
15.12.2017 | Cornell University

nachricht Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake
12.12.2017 | Duke University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

15.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

15.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists

15.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>