Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A cautionary note in the use of carbon nanotubes as interconnects

17.09.2008
Researchers at the University of Surrey’s Advanced Technology Institute (UK) have used scanning tunnelling microscopy to confirm remarkable changes in the fundamental electronic behaviour when double-walled carbon nanotubes are subject to radial deformations and torsional strain.

The work reported in Nano Letters (reference below) reveals that squashing and twisting a double-walled nanotube opens an electronic band gap in an otherwise metallic system, which has major ramifications on the use of carbon nanotubes for electronic and NEMS applications.

Dr. Cristina Giusca, the lead author of the paper said: “Fundamentally, the importance of the intershell interaction in collapsed double-walled carbon nanotubes points to the potential of a reversible metal-semiconductor junction, which can have device applications, as well as sending a cautionary note in the design of semiconductor components based on carbon nanotubes”.

Since deformations can occur in response to the growth, processing or characterization conditions of carbon nanotubes, the work is of relevance in matters concerning the characterisation of these structures, as the majority of electronic transport measurements are performed using various metals to contact the nanotubes, and the measured values could in this case be affected by hidden contributions.

Professor Ravi Silva, who leads the Advanced Technology Institute, indicated that “These findings are of crucial importance for the future integration of carbon nanotubes with conventional existing electronic technologies, where, for example, fabrication methods can induce deformations by placing control electrodes on top of nanotubes or by embedding the nanotubes into other structures”.

Chief among the use of these structures would be carbon nanotubes as interconnects for the billion dollar semiconductor industry which, according to the ITRS roadmap, has yet to have a solution in place for 2012 integrated circuits. Therefore, the deformation and mechanical integrity study on a nano-scale of these essential components would be of paramount importance.

Additionally, the work should pose an excellent challenge to experimentalists to create ingenious ways which allow deforming carbon nanotubes in a controllable manner to easily provide the required metallic or semiconducting features. As high conformational deformations, similar to the ones presented in the paper, have been shown by simulations to significantly enhance locally the chemical reactivity of carbon nanotubes, controlled deformations could also find prospective applications for potential sensing devices.

Stuart Miller | alfa
Further information:
http://www.surrey.ac.uk
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl801782k

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Linear potentiometer LRW2/3 - Maximum precision with many measuring points
17.05.2017 | WayCon Positionsmesstechnik GmbH

nachricht First flat lens for immersion microscope provides alternative to centuries-old technique
17.05.2017 | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>