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Value of volunteering more than economic

With rising unemployment and fewer job vacancies, the current financial crisis has seen renewed policy emphasis in both Europe and the UK on volunteering as a route to employment, according to a new report from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC.)

'The Value of Volunteering' – which features contributions from academics, representatives from the UK government, third sector organisations and volunteers themselves – outlines fresh UK government initiatives to use volunteering to help people into jobs, and offers powerful examples of how volunteering can change people's lives for the better.

It also calls for more effective use of European Social Fund to incentivise providers to offer voluntary activity as a pathway to integration especially for groups furthest from the labour market.

Liam Clements, now employed as a youth worker, explains how volunteering helped him, commenting: "I felt the whole experience turned me into a leader and a great communicator, and I'm now very optimistic." Paul Murphy is also now in full-time paid work, with the experience he gained through his voluntary work considered invaluable by his new employer.

Recent months have seen significant activity from the UK government in the area of volunteering. Between April and July 2009, 1,200 Jobseeker's Allowance claimants reaching six months of unemployment took up volunteering placements through a new national brokerage service. Additionally, the Office of the Third Sector now funds a National Talent Bank to provide volunteering opportunities for people whose work has been affected by the recession, and has created an Access to Volunteering programme to enable more people with disabilities to volunteer.

Dr Jeremy Kendall of the University of Kent points out that the value of volunteering now enjoys great recognition in both the UK and Europe - including the European Union (EU), the European Social Fund for example has long recognised voluntary activity as a positive outcome especially for disadvantaged groups. But he warns that the EU's emphasis on market-led economic growth may underplay the richness and breadth of volunteering, and that policy makers will need to keep this in mind when seeking to benefit from the EU's interest.

Concentrating on refugees as a group disadvantaged in the employment market, Dr Frances Tomlinson of London Metropolitan University argues that the value of refugee volunteering must be recognised, and that it must be properly resourced. She explains: "Even highly skilled refugees face a range of barriers to employment, and the transition from volunteering to paid work is often difficult. Resource issues aside, volunteers must be better protected by equal opportunities policies and practice, and volunteer experience should be given parity with that arising from paid work."

Speaking at the seminar 'The Value of Volunteering - Helping to build an inclusive and cohesive society', at which the report was launched, chair Tamara Flanagan of Community Service Volunteers (CSV) and the Third Sector European Network (TSEN) commented: "It is clear that, whilst good work is being done in the UK, there are concerns that some current policy approaches might limit the extent to which volunteering helps people and contributes to our society – we must find new outcomes to reward, and new ways of evaluating them."

ESRC Press Office:

Danielle Moore (Tel: 01793 413122, email:

Jeanine Woolley (Tel: 01793 413119, email:
(Out of office hours number, Tel: 07554333336)
1. This release is based on the findings from 'The Value of Volunteering' - which features contributions from academics, representatives from the UK government, third sector organisations and volunteers themselves. 'The Value of Volunteering' was funded and produced by the Economic and Social Research Council in partnership with the Third Sector European Network (TSEN) and Community Service Volunteers (CSV). The events were part of the Public Policy Seminar series, which directly addresses key issues faced by ESRC's key stakeholders in government, politics, the media, and the private and voluntary sectors. If you would like to receive a free copy of the publication please email

2.The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is the UK 's largest organisation for funding research on economic and social issues. It supports independent, high quality research which has an impact on business, the public sector and the third sector. The ESRC's planned total expenditure in 2009/10 is £204 million. At any one time the ESRC supports over 4,000 researchers and postgraduate students in academic institutions and independent research institutes. More at

3.The Third Sector European Network Ltd. (TSEN) is a network of sub-regional, regional and national umbrella organisations as well as other regional/national organisations from the Third Sector, active in the promotion of social inclusion and active citizenship through the use of European Structural Funds as well as other EU funding. TSEN was set up in 1995 to bring together the key Third Sector organisations active in the field of EU Structural Funds in England: regional networks and national bodies such as the Industrial Common Ownership Movement (representing co-operatives and community enterprise, since superseded by Co-operatives UK) and CSV.

4. CSV (Community Service Volunteers) creates opportunities for people to take an active part in the life of their communities through volunteering, training and community action. Last year 167,064 people gave their time as volunteers through CSV. The charity trained 12, 196 people of all ages.

Danielle Moore | EurekAlert!
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