Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

'Real level' of unemployment still far higher than official figures

13.06.2007
An independent report out today (Wednesday) finds that the real level of unemployment across Britain is around 2.6 million.

The report, by researchers at Sheffield Hallam University, finds that since 1997 real levels of unemployment have dropped by only 600,000, compared to a fall of 900,000 on the official ‘claimant count’ measure. Furthermore, the study reveals that most of this decrease was achieved between 1997 and 2002.

The report, The Real Level of Unemployment 2007, comes out on the same day that the government’s monthly unemployment figures are expected to show that the number of people out of work and claiming unemployment benefits remains below one million.

However, the report is not all bad reading for Gordon Brown. It finds that the biggest reductions in ‘real unemployment’ have occurred among men in Labour’s older industrial heartlands – the group for whom unemployment was often highest during the Conservative years.

The difference between the official figures and the Sheffield Hallam estimates is explained by the large number of people who have been diverted onto other benefits or out of the benefits system altogether. In particular, an estimated one million of the 2.7 million on incapacity benefits should be regarded as ‘hidden unemployed’, the report explains.

Professor Steve Fothergill, who led the study at Sheffield Hallam University explains, "This does not mean that one million incapacity claims are fraudulent, but these men and women would almost certainly have been in work in a genuinely fully employed economy."

The report provides alternative estimates of unemployment for every district in Britain.

The figures show that hidden unemployment is particularly concentrated in the older industrial areas of the North, Scotland and Wales. The estimated real rate of unemployment is well above ten per cent in a number of cities, including Liverpool, Glasgow and Middlesbrough, and in several former coal mining areas. In contrast, the report confirms that much of the South of England outside London is at, or close to, full employment.

Today’s unemployment report is the third by the Sheffield Hallam University team – similar estimates were published in 1997 and 2002.

Professor Fothergill comments, “The large fall in claimant unemployment, coupled with the relative invisibility of unemployment on incapacity benefits or off benefits altogether, has created the misleading impression that the unemployment problem is fading away.

"Though levels of joblessness are clearly down on a decade ago and there has been no return to the sky-high unemployment of the 1980s and early 1990s, the in-coming Prime Minister needs to be aware that many parts of the North, Scotland and Wales still have a long way to go to match the employment levels found in the booming South of England”

Lorna Branton | alfa
Further information:
http://www.shu.ac.uk

More articles from Business and Finance:

nachricht Frugal Innovations: when less is more
19.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

nachricht Europe's microtechnology industry is attuned to growth
10.03.2017 | IVAM Fachverband für Mikrotechnik

All articles from Business and Finance >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Strathclyde-led research develops world's highest gain high-power laser amplifier

The world's highest gain high power laser amplifier - by many orders of magnitude - has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde.

The researchers demonstrated the feasibility of using plasma to amplify short laser pulses of picojoule-level energy up to 100 millijoules, which is a 'gain'...

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Copper hydroxide nanoparticles provide protection against toxic oxygen radicals in cigarette smoke

29.05.2017 | Life Sciences

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>