Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Encore of corporate tax holiday unlikely to stimulate economy

20.04.2011
A repeat of a corporate tax holiday that found little success in stimulating the economy in 2005 is still a long-shot to jump-start a stagnant U.S. economy, says a University of Illinois expert in corporate and international taxation.

Dhammika Dharmapala, a professor of law at Illinois, says that while the idea of a tax holiday has found favor among some politicians and presidential hopefuls looking to jolt the country out of the financial doldrums, it would have little positive effect on economic growth.

"Ostensibly, the aim is to increase domestic investment and employment – that is, to induce firms to buy more machinery or hire more workers and the like," Dharmapala said. "However, the firms that repatriated money from abroad in 2005 tended not to increase domestic investment and employment levels. So to try the same thing again and expect a different result might be described as a triumph of hope over experience."

The 2005 tax holiday, which was a result of the American Job Creation Act of 2004, allowed firms to repatriate cash from abroad and pay only 5 percent in tax.

"The U.S. corporate tax rate is 35 percent, reduced by the amount of foreign tax a firm pays," Dharmapala said. "To pay only 5 percent tax creates a very large incentive for firms to bring cash back, and they responded by bringing back over $300 billion."

So what happened to all that repatriated cash?

"It resulted in the repurchase of shares, so that cash was returned to shareholders," Dharmapala said. "One could argue that it might be better to have that cash in the hands of shareholders than have it stay abroad, but it certainly didn't boost the economy. Most shareholders were probably not constrained in their consumption activities to begin with in 2005, so I wouldn't expect anything different this time around."

Since Congress didn't create any sort of tracing rules nor require incremental spending of the repatriated cash, Dharmapala says the tax holiday of 2005 became a textbook example of the fungible nature of money.

"If a firm was planning to spend $100 million on domestic investment, they could designate $100 million brought back from abroad as that money, which then frees up some other $100 million to repurchase shares," he said. "As long as the amount firms brought back doesn't exceed domestic investment, it's difficult to design a rule that could bypass that problem. Moreover, the laws that Congress passes about repatriation taxes cannot fundamentally affect the set of investment opportunities available to firms. Even if such measures are completely effective in their aims, they would create the problem of forcing firms to engage in unprofitable investments."

According to Dharmapala, the revived proposals for another tax holiday – even though the 2005 holiday was sold to legislators and the public as a one-time event – reflect ongoing concerns about high levels of unemployment and the perceived lack of investment by firms in the U.S.

"The problem is that we don't really know why firms aren't investing right now," he said. "By historical standards, firms are sitting on a lot of cash, so it's difficult to see why their investment behavior would change simply by giving them less costly access to their foreign cash."

Ironically, one of the unintended consequences of the 2005 tax holiday is that it may have actually increased the amount of foreign cash holding, Dharmapala said.

"It created the expectation that there would be future tax holidays," he said. "So firms started stockpiling cash abroad – in some cases, even more cash than they normally would have – all over again in anticipation of future tax holidays."

Although it's difficult to predict whether there is enough political momentum for another tax holiday, Dharmapala notes the potential trade-off between long-term tax reforms and short-term stimulus measures.

"Another short-term tax holiday may undermine these long-term goals," he said.

Phil Ciciora | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.illinois.edu

More articles from Business and Finance:

nachricht Preferential trade agreements enhance global trade at the expense of its resilience
17.02.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht How Strong Brands Translate into Money
15.11.2016 | Kühne Logistics University - Wissenschaftliche Hochschule für Logistik und Unternehmensführung

All articles from Business and Finance >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>