Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


New Data Reveal University Startup Creation, Licensing Activity Strong Despite Economic Downturn

In fiscal year 2009, in the midst of the Great Recession, 596 new companies were formed as a result of university research, according to survey data published Oct. 4 by the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM), a nonprofit association of academic technology transfer professionals.

AUTM announces the release of highlights from the AUTM U.S. Licensing Activity Survey: FY2009, a report scheduled for release at the end of the year. The survey summary shares quantitative information about and real-world examples of licensing activities at U.S. universities, hospitals and research institutions.

“The data in this survey reveal that universities were able to maintain their level of startup company creation,” says Ashley J. Stevens, DPhil, CLP, AUTM president. He adds, “The majority of these startups are located in the licensing institution’s home state, further proof that the Bayh-Dole Act continues to have a positive impact on local economies.”

Enacted on December 12, 1980, the Bayh-Dole Act enabled academic institutions and businesses to retain title to inventions made under federally funded research programs and created a uniform intellectual property management policy for the federal agencies that fund research. This year marks the Act’s 30th anniversary.

“The data offer a glimpse into the state of academic technology transfer,” says Shawn Hawkins, AUTM vice president for metrics & surveys. She adds, “Total license income declined 32.5 percent from what had been reported in fiscal year 2008, but this was expected because the 2008 figures included two large, one time royalty stream monetization payments totaling close to $1 billion. The 2009 figure is much closer to the historic trend line without 2008."

Highlights of the AUTM U.S. Licensing Activity SurveyTM FY2009 include:
• 658 new commercial products introduced
• 5,328 total license and options executed, 4,374 of which were licenses
• 596 new companies formed
• 3,423 startup companies still operating as of the end of FY2009
• $53.5 billion total sponsored research expenditures
• 20,309 disclosures
• $2.3 billion total licensing income
Patents filed
• 18,214 total U.S. patent applications
• 8,364 new U.S. patent applications
• 1,322 non-U.S. patent applications
Patents issued
• 3,417 issued U.S. patents
Members of the press may contact Jodi Talley at +1-847-559-0846 or at AUTM headquarters for additional survey highlights and information, to set up an interview and to request a complimentary copy of the survey summary when it is published in December.

About AUTM

The Association of University Technology Managers is a nonprofit organization with an international membership of more than 3,000 technology managers and business executives. AUTM members — managers of intellectual property, one of the most active growth sectors of the global economy —come from more than 300 universities, research institutions and teaching hospitals as well as numerous businesses and government organizations.

Jodi Talley | Newswise Science News
Further information:

More articles from Business and Finance:

nachricht Blockchain Set to Transform the Financial Services Market
28.09.2016 | HHL Leipzig Graduate School of Management

nachricht Paper or plastic?
08.07.2016 | University of Toronto

All articles from Business and Finance >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

Im Focus: Ultra-thin ferroelectric material for next-generation electronics

'Ferroelectric' materials can switch between different states of electrical polarization in response to an external electric field. This flexibility means they show promise for many applications, for example in electronic devices and computer memory. Current ferroelectric materials are highly valued for their thermal and chemical stability and rapid electro-mechanical responses, but creating a material that is scalable down to the tiny sizes needed for technologies like silicon-based semiconductors (Si-based CMOS) has proven challenging.

Now, Hiroshi Funakubo and co-workers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, in collaboration with researchers across Japan, have conducted experiments to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia

21.10.2016 | Health and Medicine

Stanford researchers create new special-purpose computer that may someday save us billions

21.10.2016 | Information Technology

From ancient fossils to future cars

21.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>