Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UC San Diego to Develop Ocean Observing Cyberinfrastructure

04.09.2009
The U.S. has taken the next step toward construction of the revolutionary Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI): a network of ocean observing components, and their associated cyberinfrastructure, that will allow scientists to examine ocean processes on global, regional and coastal scales.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Washington, D.C.-based Consortium for Ocean Leadership (Ocean Leadership) have signed a Cooperative Agreement today that supports the construction and initial operation of the OOI. In collaboration with Ocean Leadership, the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) is slated to receive a total of approximately $32 million to develop and construct the science-driven, networked cyberinfrastructure, which ties together all the ocean sensors to be deployed during the next five years.

"The OOI provides scientists, for the first time, an infrastructure to conduct interactive experiments in some of the ocean’s most extreme environments," said Principal Investigator John Orcutt, a professor of geophysics at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography, "This interactive capability will be enabled by the OOI cyberinfrastructure, which links and binds the physical infrastructure into a state-of-the-art scientific network that can be accessed in near-real-time (within seconds of data collection) by any scientist; in fact, any person." The near-real-time access and complete openness of the data are unique to the OOI.

“OOI has been under design by NSF and its contractors for nearly a decade,” said Scripps Institution of Oceanography Director Tony Haymet, “and significant institutional support from Scripps and its partners has contributed to the successful development of the OOI over that period. We are delighted to be playing such a key role in implementing these critical capabilities for ocean science and society.”

Considerable international interest exists about ocean observing, with cabled observatories in place in Canada, Japan, Europe, and Australia, and under construction in China and Korea. The OOI expands those international capabilities, using cabled, moored, and mobile observing tools to broaden the scope of ocean conditions under rigorous observation.

The UCSD division of Calit2 manages the day-to-day functions of the project and will design and build the cyberinfrastructure.

The 5.5-year construction phase will begin in September, with nearly $106 million of first-year funds coming from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and $5.91 million in NSF construction funds. Requests in FY 2010 and beyond, totaling $274.58 million for construction, will enable the acquisition of OOI instruments and sensors, production of key infrastructure elements (such as the coastal and open ocean moorings), and the deployment of these assets.

Once construction is completed, scientists will be able to observe complex ocean processes such as climate variability, ocean circulation, and ocean acidification across a range of spatial scales at several coastal, open-ocean, and seafloor locations.

Continuous data-flow from hundreds of sensors will be integrated by the sophisticated computing network developed by Scripps and Calit2, and will be available to scientists, policy makers, students, and the public. The OOI will transform ocean science research and education by providing unprecedented power and bandwidth for an interactive connection to the ocean through diverse sets of sensors, and near real-time access to data.

The first year of funding under the Cooperative Agreement will support a wide range of construction efforts, including production engineering and prototyping of key coastal and open-ocean components (moorings, buoys, sensors), awarding the primary seafloor cable installation contract, completing a shore station for power and data, and developing software for sensor interfaces to the network.

In 2010, the program will add an Education and Public Engagement team that will use the OOI data streams and infrastructure to develop innovative approaches for outreach. During a lesson on the El Niño phenomenon, for example, a science teacher might use a combination of the OOI's raw scientific data, data graphs and annotated Google Maps to write an application that visualizes ocean temperature distribution near the California coast. A lesson on deep-sea microbial ecologies might involve watching a high-definition video feed that captures an underwater volcano emitting plumes of superheated water. Key to innovation in education and outreach will be harnessing the power of the OOI cyberinfrastructure for educational purposes. The UCSD cyberinfrastructure team, including dedicated educational technology specialists, will help establish the critical links between the OOI and non-scientist audiences.

Subsequent years of funding will support the completion of coastal, deep-ocean, and seafloor systems, with initial data-flow scheduled for early 2013 and final commissioning of the full system by 2015.

“This award represents the fulfillment of over a decade of planning and hard work by hundreds of ocean scientists, and also reflects the commitment of the National Science Foundation to new approaches for documenting ocean processes," said OOI Program Director Tim Cowles. "Those of us within the OOI project team are excited to play a role in implementing this unique suite of observing assets – knowing that we’re building an infrastructure that will transform ocean sciences."

The OOI is managed and coordinated by the OOI Project Office at the Consortium for Ocean Leadership, with three major implementing organizations responsible for the construction of the components of the full network. In addition to UCSD and its partner, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, being responsible for the Cyberinfrastructure, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and its partners, Oregon State University and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, are responsible for the Coastal and Global moorings and their autonomous vehicles. The University of Washington is responsible for cabled seafloor systems and moorings over the Juan de Fuca tectonic plate.

Scientific Contact:
John Orcutt, Principal Investigator, OOI Cyberinfrastructure, 858-518-0634, jorcutt@ucsd.edu

Doug Ramsey | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.ucsd.edu

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht In times of climate change: What a lake’s colour can tell about its condition
21.09.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Gewässerökologie und Binnenfischerei (IGB)

nachricht Did marine sponges trigger the ‘Cambrian explosion’ through ‘ecosystem engineering’?
21.09.2017 | Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam - Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>