Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Texas Tech Seismologist: Christchurch Quake Location Surprising, More Large Quakes Near City Unlikely

25.02.2011
Though Tuesday’s earthquake in New Zealand wasn’t in itself surprising, the locality so close to southern New Zealand’s largest city did catch many off guard, said a Texas Tech University geophysicists and seismologist.

An earthquake measuring 6.3 rocked Christchurch three miles from the city center, and news reports have estimated 75 deaths with more than 300 people still missing.

“The locality beneath Christchurch is definitely surprising, but everything else is not so surprising,” said Hua-wei Zhou, the Pevehouse Chair and Professor of Petroleum Geophysics and Seismology in the Department of Geosciences. “This is the sixth aftershock measuring 5.0 or more since the last big earthquake on Sept. 3, 2010.”

Zhou explained that while the Sept. 3, 2010, earthquake measured 7.0 in magnitude, it happened in a relatively rural area 30 miles west of Christchurch and didn’t cause as much damage. Because of the earthquake’s location and the fault’s motion – a strike-slip motion with plates grinding horizontally with some vertical movement also – this may have intensified the damage in an already heavily populated area.

Because of the historical rarity of earthquakes in the city, Zhou predicted that the Christchurch area most likely wouldn’t experience another earthquake for several years to decades.

In May 2008, Zhou led a team of six graduate students to deploy 60 seismometers near the Three Gorges Dam after an earthquake measuring 7.9 struck the Sichuan province in Central China. Zhou's research interests include improving seismic imaging methods and mapping mantle and crustal seismic structures of various regions.

Find Texas Tech news, experts and story ideas at www.media.ttu.edu and on Twitter @TexasTechMedia.

CONTACT: Hua-wei Zhou, Pevehouse Chair and Professor of Petroleum Geophyiscs and Seismology in the Department of Geophysics, Texas Tech University, (806) 742-1308 or h.zhou@ttu.edu

John Davis | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.ttu.edu

Further reports about: Christchurch Geophysics Large Hadron Collider Petroleum Quake seismology

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Tiny microenvironments in the ocean hold clues to global nitrogen cycle
23.04.2018 | University of Rochester

nachricht Clear as mud: Desiccation cracks help reveal the shape of water on Mars
20.04.2018 | Geological Society of America

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tiny microenvironments in the ocean hold clues to global nitrogen cycle

23.04.2018 | Earth Sciences

Joining metals without welding

23.04.2018 | Trade Fair News

Researchers illuminate the path to a new era of microelectronics

23.04.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>