Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Satellite Sandwich Technique Improves Analysis of Geographical Data

09.04.2013
UC student researcher develops method to combine thermal data from separate satellite systems to create large, detailed maps of regional temperature fluctuation.

Combining parallel data from separate satellites can be like trying to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

For the sandwich, you want rich and sweet flavors, blended into a smooth, creamy texture – and you want it all in one convenient package. That’s similar to how you want the satellite data, and Bo Yang, a University of Cincinnati graduate student in geography, has a formula for crafting a deeply informative and easily utilized satellite sandwich.

He’ll present his research, “Spatiotemporal Cokriging Images Fusion of Multi-Sensor Land Surface Temperature over Thaw Lakes on North Alaska,” at the Association of American Geographers annual meeting to be held April 9-13 in Los Angeles. The interdisciplinary forum is attended by more than 7,000 scientists from around the world and features an array of geography-related presentations, workshops and field trips.

For his master’s thesis, Yang studied thermal data from two different types of polar-orbiting satellite systems. One system frequently records large images of a region on Earth but in little detail. Another system records small images less frequently but in much greater detail. Analyzing two massive sets of parallel data and finding a way to make them overlap can be complicated and time-consuming. Yang is developing a method to simplify the process.

“In an easy-to-understand way, I am trying to derive both very high-definition and high-frequency revisiting imagery from two satellite-carried sensors,” Yang says. “I use the spatial statistics technique known as co-kriging to fuse multi-sensor land surface temperature images.”

Yang uses an algorithm he devised to fill the spatiotemporal gaps between the two data sets. The result is an intricately detailed map covering a large surface area that allows geographers to quickly derive daily – even hourly – surface temperature and emissivity information. These environmental parameters are important to agriculture and water resource management and can be used to detect the onset and severity of drought.

Yang used thaw lakes in the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska as his study area. These lakes are a critical component to Arctic ecology and one that is considered vulnerable to the effects of climate warming. Yang’s work is connected to a larger project under way in the region, the Circumarctic Lakes Observation Network. The National Science Foundation-funded effort aims to gather long-term, spatially extensive data to evaluate the effect of climate change on the region. UC faculty involved in the project include professors Kenneth Hinkel, Richard Beck, Wendy Eisner, Changjoo Kim, Hongxing Liu and Amy Townsend-Small, all of the McMicken College of Arts & Sciences.

Additional contributors to Yang’s research paper were UC professors Hongxing Liu and Emily Kang, and UC doctoral student Qiusheng Wu.

Funding for Yang’s research was provided by the National Science Foundation and NASA.

In 2012, UC was named among the nation’s top "green" schools by The Princeton Review due to its strong commitment to sustainability in academic offerings, campus infrastructure, activities and career preparation. It was the third year in a row that UC earned a spot on the prestigious list.

Tom Robinette | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uc.edu

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht NASA sees quick development of Hurricane Dora
27.06.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht Collapse of the European ice sheet caused chaos
27.06.2017 | CAGE - Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Climate and Environment

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Touch Displays WAY-AX and WAY-DX by WayCon

27.06.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Drones that drive

27.06.2017 | Information Technology

Ultra-compact phase modulators based on graphene plasmons

27.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>