Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers Find Link Between the Input of Iron and Biological Productivity in the Ancient Pacific Ocean

16.03.2012
A team of researchers has just published a new paper, lead authored by Boston University Professor of Earth Sciences Richard W. Murray, that provides compelling evidence from marine sediment that supports the theory that iron in the Earth’s oceans has a direct impact on biological productivity, potentially affecting the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and, in turn, atmospheric temperature. These findings have been published in the March 11, 2012 online edition of the journal Nature Geoscience (DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1422). (See www.nature.com/naturegeoscience.)

The oceans are the world's largest inventory of reactive carbon. Over time, oceanic carbon exchanges with the atmospheric reservoir of carbon in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2). Much of the carbon present in the surface oceans is taken up by the growth of marine plants (primarily by phytoplankton) through photosynthesis. Consequently, marine biological productivity is recognized as a factor in determining the amount of atmospheric carbon dioxide at various times in the Earth’s history.

The magnitude of ocean biological productivity depends on the availability of key nutrients, including nitrogen, phosphorous and metals such as iron. In fact, previous research has established that biological productivity in the equatorial Pacific and the oceans around Antarctica is limited by the amount of iron, a micro-nutrient, more than by the better-known 'major' nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus.

The link between iron and marine biological productivity first gained attention more than twenty years ago with the publication of a controversial paper by the late John Martin, an oceanographer at the at the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (California State University). Martin’s “Iron Hypothesis” postulates that biological productivity could be stimulated by increasing the amount of iron in the ocean, which in turn would draw down atmospheric carbon dioxide. He further argued that this process contributed to ancient ice ages: When the earth was drier and therefore dustier, more iron was deposited in the oceans, thus stimulating biological productivity, reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide and cooling the earth (the inverse of global warming). This could result in prolonged glacial periods. By closely examining the sedimentary record, Murray and his colleagues have established a clear relationship between plant plankton (diatoms) and the input of iron, exactly as Martin predicted.

Many researchers since Martin have established that the availability of iron in the modern ocean determines the amount of biological production in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions and may be important in lower-nutrient settings as well. By examining the paleo-oceanographic record of iron input and the deposition of diatoms, Murray and his colleagues found that the ancient system is highly consistent with what occurs in the oceans today.

The new publication provides an important sedimentary record from the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll region of the equatorial Pacific Ocean, and shows strong links between iron input and the export and burial of biogenic silica (opal produced from diatoms) over the past million years. Although the direct relationship to climate remains unclear, data collected by the team demonstrate that iron accumulation is more closely tied to the accumulation of opal than any other biogenic component, and that high iron input closely correlates with substantially increased opal sedimentation. The strong links between iron and opal accumulation in the past are in agreement with the modern biogeochemical behavior of iron and silica, and the response of the diatom community to their mutual availability, all of which supports Martin’s postulate of a biological response to iron delivery over long timescales.

The co-authors of this study are Margaret Leinen, Executive Director, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution and Associate Provost for Marine and Environmental Initiatives, Florida Atlantic University, and Christopher W. Knowlton, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett. Murray first began working on these research ideas while a post-doctoral researcher in Leinen’s laboratory at the University of Rhode Island in the 1990’s, and Knowlton is a former graduate student of Leinen’s who studied the opal distribution in these sediments.

About Boston University—Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized private research university with more than 30,000 students participating in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. As Boston University’s largest academic division, the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences is the heart of the BU experience with a global reach that enhances the University’s reputation for teaching and research.

Richard W. Murray, Professor
Department of Earth Sciences
Boston University
685 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
Office Phone (617) 353-6532
Email rickm@bu.edu

Richard W. Murray, Professor | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.bu.edu

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Geophysicists and atmospheric scientists partner to track typhoons' seismic footprints
16.02.2018 | Princeton University

nachricht NASA finds strongest storms in weakening Tropical Cyclone Sanba
15.02.2018 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

Im Focus: Autonomous 3D scanner supports individual manufacturing processes

Let’s say the armrest is broken in your vintage car. As things stand, you would need a lot of luck and persistence to find the right spare part. But in the world of Industrie 4.0 and production with batch sizes of one, you can simply scan the armrest and print it out. This is made possible by the first ever 3D scanner capable of working autonomously and in real time. The autonomous scanning system will be on display at the Hannover Messe Preview on February 6 and at the Hannover Messe proper from April 23 to 27, 2018 (Hall 6, Booth A30).

Part of the charm of vintage cars is that they stopped making them long ago, so it is special when you do see one out on the roads. If something breaks or...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Fingerprints of quantum entanglement

16.02.2018 | Information Technology

'Living bandages': NUST MISIS scientists develop biocompatible anti-burn nanofibers

16.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Hubble sees Neptune's mysterious shrinking storm

16.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>