Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers Find Evidence of Geological ‘Facelift’ in the Appalachians

01.02.2013
How does a mountain range maintain its youthful, rugged appearance after 200 million years without tectonic activity? Try a geological facelift – courtesy of the earth’s mantle.

Researchers from North Carolina State University noticed that a portion of the Appalachian Mountains in western North Carolina near the Cullasaja River basin was topographically quite different from its surroundings.

They found two distinct landscapes in the basin: an upper portion with gentle, rounded hills, where the average distance from valley to mountain top was about 500 feet; and a lower portion where the valley bottom to ridgeline elevation difference was 2,500 feet, hills were steep, and there was an abundance of waterfalls. The researchers believed they could use this unique topography to decipher the more recent geologic history of the region.

The Appalachian mountain range was formed between 325 to 260 million years ago by tectonic activity – when tectonic plates underneath the earth’s surface collided and pushed the mountains up. Around 230 million years ago, the Atlantic Ocean basin began to open, and this also affected the regional topography. But geologists knew that there hadn’t been any significant tectonic activity in the region since then.

“Conventional wisdom holds that in the absence of tectonic activity, mountainous terrain gets eroded and beveled down, so the terrain isn’t as dramatic,” says Sean Gallen, NC State graduate student in marine, earth and atmospheric sciences. “When we noticed that this area looked more like younger mountain ranges instead of the older, rounded, rolling topography around it, we wanted to figure out what was going on.”

Gallen and Karl Wegmann, an assistant professor of marine, earth and atmospheric sciences at NC State, decided to look at the waterfalls in the area, because they would have formed as the topography changed. By measuring the rate of erosion for the falls they could extrapolate their age, and therefore calculate how long ago this particular region was “rejuvenated” or lifted up. They found that these particular waterfalls were about 8 million years old, which indicated that the landscape must have been raised up around the same time.

But without tectonic activity, how did the uplift occur? Gallen and Wegmann point to the earth’s mantle as the most likely culprit. “The earth’s outer shell is the crust, but the next layer down – the mantle – is essentially a very viscous fluid,” Wegmann says. “When it’s warm it can well up, pushing the crust up like a big blister. If a heavy portion of the crust underneath the Appalachians ‘broke off,’ so to speak, this area floated upward on top of the blister. In this case, our best hypothesis is that mantle dynamics rejuvenated the landscape.”

The researchers’ findings appear in Geological Society of America Today. Del Bohnenstiehl, NC State associate professor of marine, earth and atmospheric sciences, contributed to the work.

Note to editors: Abstract follows.

“Miocene rejuvenation of topographic relief in the southern Appalachians”

Authors: Sean F. Gallen, Karl W. Wegmann, and DelWayne R. Bohnenstiehl, North Carolina State University

Published: Geological Society of America Today

Abstract:
Conventional wisdom holds that the southern Appalachian Mountains have not experienced a significant phase of tectonic forcing for > 200 m.y.; yet, they share many characteristics with tectonically active settings, including locally high topographic relief, steep slopes, incised river gorges and frequent mass-wasting events. Two competing hypotheses are commonly used to explain their modern topographic expression. One suggests that relief is largely controlled by variable lithologic resistance to weathering and that their modern form has long persisted in a dynamic equilibrium. The second postulates that their relief is a product of recent rejuvenation, driven either by climate change or the epeirogenic uplift of the land surface driven by mantle forcing. Within portions of the Cullasaja River Basin of the southern Appalachians, we show that relief has increased by > 150% since the Miocene. Evident within the basin are a set of retreating knickpoints that delineate a rugged actively incising landscape from lower-relief relict topography. Constraints on the timing of knickpoint entry into the basin suggest that the process of landscape rejuvenation began well prior to the late Cenozoic (

Tracey Peake | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ncsu.edu

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht New Study Will Help Find the Best Locations for Thermal Power Stations in Iceland
19.01.2017 | University of Gothenburg

nachricht Water - as the underlying driver of the Earth’s carbon cycle
17.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biogeochemie

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>