Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Research priorities for the Arctic have been defined

18.02.2016

International research organisations are defining priorities for the coming decade

The leading international Arctic research organisations have set common scientific objectives for the coming decade. The indigenous peoples of the Arctic were also involved in this process. Under the auspices of the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), which is based at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Potsdam, they are about to submit a report that sets out the path for a jointly conceived and solution-oriented research agenda on the sustainable development of the Arctic and beyond.


Scientists in the field

Photo: Don Perovich

The Arctic is the region on earth that reacts most sensitively and most quickly to changes in climate. However, what happens in the Arctic does not stay in the Arctic. The decrease in the sea ice cover, the thawing of the permafrost, snow and glaciers have an impact on the global climate system. Furthermore, growing economic and geopolitical interests in the Arctic do not just cause changes in the Arctic itself, but also far beyond its borders.

"The goal of science has to be to generate knowledge and to pass it on to decision-makers, so that they can be prepared for these changes and not only react to them", says Dr Volker Rachold, Executive Secretary of the IASC at the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research.

The scientific report will be presented at the beginning of March at the summit meeting of Arctic researchers, the Arctic Science Summit Week – ASSW, in Fairbanks (Alaska). In addition to questions and focal points, the report will also show how science should tackle these issues.

"As we developed the scientific objectives, three main priorities for future Arctic research clearly emerged", says Rachold. The first priority is to explore the role of the Arctic within the global climate, economic and geopolitical system. Secondly, the research organisations are planning to add better models and forecasts about future climate development in the Arctic and the impact on the Arctic eco-systems to their agenda. Thirdly, we need a better understanding of the vulnerability as well as the resilience of the Arctic environment and society as a scientific basis for the sustainable development of the Arctic.

A significant conclusion of the study was that, in order to achieve these goals, both the indigenous and local population of the Arctic and the other stakeholders must be involved in formulating the research questions. "We will set out the path for a jointly conceived and solution-oriented research agenda on the sustainable development of the Arctic and beyond", IASC Executive Secretary summarises.

The original report, "Integrating Arctic Research - a Roadmap for the Future" of the 3rd International Conference on Arctic Research Planning ICARP III is available for download at: http://icarp.iasc.info/

Notes for Editors:

Your contact persons are Dr Volker Rachold (tel.: 0331 288-2212; e-mail: Volker.Rachold(at)awi.de) as well as Dr Folke Mehrtens at the press office of the Alfred Wegener Institute (tel.: 0471 4831-2007; e-mail: Folke.Mehrtens(at)awi.de).

Please find printable images in the online version of this press release: http://www.awi.de/nc/en/about-us/service/press.html

The Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) conducts research in the Arctic, Antarctic and oceans of the high and mid-latitudes. It coordinates polar research in Germany and provides major infrastructure to the international scientific community, such as the research icebreaker Polarstern and stations in the Arctic and Antarctica. The Alfred Wegener Institute is one of the 18 research centres of the Helmholtz Association, the largest scientific organisation in Germany.

Weitere Informationen:

http://icarp.iasc.info/ A Roadmap to the Future

Ralf Röchert | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht How much biomass grows in the savannah?
16.02.2017 | Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

nachricht Canadian glaciers now major contributor to sea level change, UCI study shows
15.02.2017 | University of California - Irvine

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>