Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers find evidence of warming climate in Ohio

10.10.2007
-- Summer nights in Ohio aren't cooling off as much as they used to -- and it's likely a sign of climatic warming across the state, researchers say.

Jeffrey Rogers, professor of geography at Ohio State University, led the new study, which found that average summer nighttime low temperatures in Ohio have risen by about 1.7 degrees Celsius (about 3 degrees Fahrenheit) since the 1960s.

Why the change? It's not just the heat, it's the humidity, the researchers concluded -- coupled with increased cloudiness at night.

Three degrees Fahrenheit might not sound like much of an increase, but it is -- even though daytime highs have remained mostly the same, said Rogers, who is also the state climatologist for Ohio.

"A lot of Americans might expect that global climate change would cause extremely high daytime temperatures in the summer," he said. "But in Ohio at least, the high temperatures haven't been changing -- it's the overnight low temperatures that have been creeping up. That means the average temperature over the 24-hour period is creeping up as well."

And this is exactly how Rogers believes that climate change would manifest itself in this region of the Midwest -- nighttime lows are rising, so that over time there would be less difference between them and the daytime highs.

That would mean a big change for Ohio, where a typical summer night is 20 degrees Fahrenheit cooler than the day.

In fact, stronger evidence of climate change would be hard to come by here, Rogers said: "In Ohio, we don't have a clear signal of global change, like you have in the Arctic, where sea ice is melting. But these rising nighttime lows are the next closest thing."

In the September 2007 issue of the Journal of Climate, Rogers and his coauthors report a survey of more than 120 years of Ohio weather data. Aside from a brief temperature spike during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, nighttime temperatures remained relatively unchanged -- until 1965, when they began to rise.

They linked the change to an increase in a measure of moisture in the air known as specific humidity, which is similar to the dew point. A second factor -- which Rogers thinks may be even more important than the humidity -- is an increase in cloud cover over Ohio since the 1940s.

"The moisture in the air keeps the heat in. It's literally an enhanced greenhouse effect with all that humidity here in the summer," Rogers said. "And at night, cloud cover acts like a blanket and traps heat that would otherwise escape into the atmosphere."

He and his colleagues are still trying to puzzle out why humidity and cloud cover are increasing.

Coauthors on the study included Sheng-Hung Wang, a research associate at the Byrd Polar Research Center at Ohio State, and Jill Coleman, an assistant professor of geography at Ball State University in Indiana.

Jeffrey Rogers | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.osu.edu

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht NASA eyes Pineapple Express soaking California
24.02.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht 'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field
23.02.2017 | Tokyo Institute of Technology

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>