Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

NASA Post-Hurricane Katrina Images Available On Google Earth

07.02.2006


When Hurricane Katrina made landfall in August 2005, it changed the look of some of the coastlines of three U.S. states. Now, using Google Earth’s software on the Internet, people can see the before and after affects, thanks to detailed images from NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

The images on Google Earth show changes that Hurricane Katrina made to the Gulf coast from Panama City, Fla. to New Orleans, La.

Hurricane Katrina made landfall in south Plaquemines Parish, La., near the towns of Empire, Buras and Boothville, on Aug. 29, 2005, at approximately 7:10 a.m. CDT. It caused widespread destruction in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama and turned out to be the most expensive hurricane in the history of the United States, causing an estimated 80 billion dollars in damages, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Katrina also turned out to be the deadliest U.S. hurricane since 1928, claiming at least 1,300 lives.



The coastlines of those states were forever changed. NASA, using an Atlantic Global Research contract aircraft and the agency’s own advanced technology, made it possible to see how much and what type of damage that Katrina caused when it came ashore.

The changes to the coasts were cataloged in detail using NASA’s laser mapping system called EAARL (Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar) onboard an airplane. EAARL uses a laser to "see" and measure distance to a surface. EAARL can be used to get closer looks at things like coral reefs, sandy beaches, coastal vegetation, and trees.

During the month of September, 2005, 250,000 pictures were taken over 5 days of flying over the coastlines.

The EAARL Principal Investigator, Charles W. Wright, of NASA’s Wallops Island Flight Facility, Wallops, Va., placed the imagery online at Google Earth. "This is the first time that I can remember such an easy-to-use tool putting so much data at the fingertips of so many people with so little effort,” Wright said.

Wright said that the people involved with the project were busy working to bring the lidar data of the New Orleans levees online for FEMA, and had not anticipated that they would be bringing the photography online.

The U.S. Geological Survey’s Coastal and Marine Geology Program investigates the how much coastlines change due to hurricanes and other powerful storms. A big benefit to using this is that it will help people make decisions on where to rebuild.

To see NASA imagery on Google Earth, first download Google Earth to your computer from the Web: http://www.earth.google.com and then open the instructions by clicking here (.pdf file).

Rob Gutro | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nasa.gov/vision/earth/lookingatearth/katrina_google.html
http://www.earth.google.com
http://inst.wff.nasa.gov/eaarl

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Supercomputing helps researchers understand Earth's interior
23.05.2017 | University of Illinois College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

nachricht How is climate change affecting fauna in the Arctic?
22.05.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>