Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

RTD info bores into polar research

25.07.2005


The Arctic and Antarctic evoke images of virgin territories playing host to a rich variety of flora, fauna and indigenous populations, but also a hardy group of intrepid researchers and explorers. A special issue of RTD info, produced with the International Polar Foundation, joins the exploration of the poles’ vast scientific wonders.

The European Commission’s flagship research publication RTD info takes readers on a journey to the ends of the Earth in its exploration of polar research. “A voyage to the polar regions of the world is also a trip through time and history,” notes the special issue of RTD info. For climate researchers, the poles are a frozen archive of global climatic change, helping them unravel what has happened in the past to better understand the future. Sample cores drilled from deep polar ice sheets allow scientists to monitor the impact of global warming and validate simulation models of future changes to the Earth’s climate system.

This issue describes the leading role that European teams are playing in diverse scientific fields – including glaciology, climatology, astronomy and the life sciences – and the importance of international co-operation in this research. Because of the harsh, cold and remote working conditions, “polar researchers … often rely on specially adapted methods and technologies to carry out their work”. This makes it a complex and costly activity, but essential nonetheless. And the more scientists learn about the two poles, the more striking their differences appear. With a long history of human settlement in the Arctic, research activities – i.e. marine biology and environmental studies – are more developed than in Antarctica. But the south is catching up fast, spearheaded by international collaborative efforts made possible by the signing of the Antarctic Treaty in 1959.



In one section of the 44-page magazine, readers discover how polar fauna and flora are coping with major climate warming. But also how seasonal changes in the Arctic are affecting native populations, such as the Dolgans, Inuits and Saami who are all struggling to keep up their hunting and herding traditions. RTD info climbs aboard icebreaker ships – floating labs for scientists to carry out experiments – travels into space to explore how satellites are tracking ice and vegetation patterns in the poles, and tours the leading European and international institutes and organisations working on polar research.

The issue is capped off by an interview with Alain Hubert, a Belgian polar explorer and co-founder of the International Polar Foundation (IPF), who talks about the importance of communicating polar research to the public. In fact, this special issue was made possible thanks to major contributions from the IPF, which was set up in 2002 to keep society informed on scientific research – especially relating to climate change – in the polar regions.

RTD info is essential reading for anyone interested in science and research. You can obtain a free copy by e-mailing to research@cec.eu.int or read it on-line at:
http://www.europa.eu.int/comm/research/rtdinfo/special_ms/index_en.htm

Michel Claessens | alfa
Further information:
http://europa.eu.int/comm/dgs/research

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents
12.12.2017 | Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

nachricht How do megacities impact coastal seas? Searching for evidence in Chinese marginal seas
11.12.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Ostseeforschung Warnemünde

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests

14.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

New type of smart windows use liquid to switch from clear to reflective

14.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

BigH1 -- The key histone for male fertility

14.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>